Nestle moves Supreme Court seeking destruction of Maggi stocks

At present, there is approximately 550 tonnes of stocks to be destroyed, which is stocked at 39 locations all over the country


Nestle submitted that till 1 September 2015 it had destroyed approximately over 38,000 tonnes of Maggi noodles, thereafter, 60 tonnes was received back from the market. Photo: Abhinav Saha/HT
Nestle submitted that till 1 September 2015 it had destroyed approximately over 38,000 tonnes of Maggi noodles, thereafter, 60 tonnes was received back from the market. Photo: Abhinav Saha/HT

New Delhi: Nestle India moved the Supreme Court on Wednesday seeking the court’s direction allowing them to destroy stocks of Maggi noodles which had been recalled from the market earlier.

Stocks of Maggi were recalled on 5 June 2015, when the Food Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) alleged that some samples of the noodles contained monosodium glutamate (MSG) and excess lead.

At present, there is approximately 550 tonnes of stocks to be destroyed, which is stocked at 39 locations all over the country, Nestle told the apex court.

It added that such stocks were well past their shelf life and that its storage would give rise to conditions that may lead to health hazard at these locations.

Nestle submitted that till 1 September 2015 it had destroyed approximately over 38,000 tonnes of Maggi noodles, thereafter, 60 tonnes was received back from the market.

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In June 2015, the Central government had brought a class action suit before NCDRC against Nestle, alleging unfair trade practices, false labelling and misleading advertisements by the firm. It has sought Rs.640 crore in compensation.

On 16 December 2015, the apex court barred the consumer forum from proceeding in the class action suit against Nestle.

Subsequently, Nestle cleared tests conducted by Central Food Technological Research Institute (CFTRI), under the apex courts’ orders and was back in the market.

The case will be heard next on Thursday.

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