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Mint Indulge | Editor’s Note

Mint Indulge | Editor’s Note
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First Published: Tue, Oct 25 2011. 01 24 AM IST

Sidin Vadukut, Issue Editor
Sidin Vadukut, Issue Editor
Updated: Tue, Nov 01 2011. 01 42 PM IST
Deconstructions
Sidin Vadukut, Issue Editor
Sidin Vadukut, Issue Editor
This second issue of Indulge you hold in your hands owes itself to a conversation I had with a reader a month or so ago, after the publication of the first issue. Eventually, we began discussing the various products that had been featured or mentioned in that issue. This reader asked me a question: How do we decide what brand of spirit, model of watch, cut of suit or variant of automobile is worthy of the Indulge treatment?
That question might seem simple enough. It’s actually quite hard to answer. I told the reader that the idea of Indulge is to create a platform to talk about great products and services. Sure, we do focus on male readers, and linger on some of
the finer things in life. But that doesn’t mean we are going to swoon all over a diamond-encrusted golf club. Unless it is also a great golf club. ( Click here to read full note )
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Managing victory
By Sidin Vadukut
Red Bull Racing Team Principal Christian Horner
Christain Horner, team principal, Red Bull Racing Formula One team, talks about how life changes when a team achieves greatness, and about his transition from racing to managing. Red Bull is the reigning F1 constructors’ champion, while Red Bull driver Sebastian Vettel became the youngest driver to win back-to-back drivers’ championships at the Japanese Grand Prix earlier this month. ( Click here to read full interview )
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Dissecting icons
By Sidin Vadukut
Exceptional products and services are rare. Products such as the iPhone, the Nintendo Wii or a Montblanc pen have come to represent much more than just excellence in utility. They represent a generational transformation in the way people use these tools. These brands and products established new benchmarks, new standards and new consumer aspirations. They didn’t just own the markets, they dismantled them.
Why were these products so powerful? How did they become symbolic not just of the consumers’ buying choices, but of their lifestyle itself? We asked three experts on the concept of greatness, what greatness means to them, and what great products they use in their daily lives. ( Click here to read full interview )
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Getting it just right
I vividly recall the first dish I ever tried to cook, when I was 12. It was my version of fried rice, the recipe of which I had tried to guess by watching the cook in the ‘’Chinese’’ food van near my house.
It was an undeniable disaster.
Fortunately, I now know that teaspoons of turmeric powder are not quite the same as soy sauce,which is what gave the rice its brown colour. So if you think you’re a terrible cook because you have trouble making even instant noodles, trust me, everyone starts off with a blank slate. ( Click here to read full column )
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The glass in your hand
By Joel Harrison
iStockphoto
Greatness. Surely one of the hardest words to define, especially when it comes to drink. What is greatness in a glass, everyone wants to know and I’m often asked, ‘‘Which is the best singlemalt whisky?”
‘’The one I’m drinking right now,” is my usual reply,because nothing else really matters other than the drink currently in your hand. Why? Simply because everything else, no matter how good, is still in the bottle. You can’t hit a century while sitting in the pavilion. Until you’re at the crease, you’re nothing. And if you have to walk early, then be gone! And let the next man try and have his name etched on to the honours board of history. ( Click here to read full column )
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The Write Stuff
By Pradip Kumar Saha
The Gaius Maecenas limited edition 888
Pen aficionados swear by its name, and connoisseurs across the world recognize the iconic logo of a white star with rounded edges. For over 90 years, Montblanc has defined perfect penmanship. Montblanc pens are known for their highest quality and their specially crafted nibs, and the company still makes the classic fountain pen. Montblanc also has an extensive line of high-end ballpoint pens and mechanical pencils. ( Click here to read full story )
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Speed demon
By Neil Rodricks
Formula One is the ultimate in speed, the premier class of racing since the first world championship was held in 1950. Capable of reaching speeds in excess of 350km per hour, it is a sport of thrill and danger. With a nine-month season covering five continents, the sport has spread well beyond its home in Europe—the focus for the last 12-13 years being on Asia. Later this month, India joins the world of Formula One racing with the subcontinent’s first grand prix to be staged at the Buddh International Circuit, Greater Noida. Indulge takes a look at a Red Bull Racing car to see what makes the Formula One machines special. ( Click here to read full story )
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Burning up the track
By Neil Rodricks
The Buddh International Circuit at Greater Noida, designed by German engineer and racer Hermann Tilke and the latest to join the Formula One calendar, is set to host one of the fastest races of motorsports’ premier class, with an average race speed of close to 210km per hour. ( Click here to read story )
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Easy Riding
By Neil Rodricks
Fat Boy from Harley-Davidson
A heavyweight in its category of heavyweight bikes, the Fat Boy was introduced as part of Harley-Davidson’s Softail line in 1990, and it promptly became a legend in itself. With its muscular styling, powerful displacement and low seating, this is the bike for a drive down those long Indian highways. Big wheels for a big country. ( Click here to read full story )
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Good Vibrations
By Neil Rodricks
Price Rs 79,990
Since the late Fritz Sennheiser founded the Laboratorium Wennebostel in 1945, manufacturing tube voltmeters that year and expanding to microphone production the next, his company has developed into a force majeure in the world of sound experience.
The Wedemark, Germanybased company offers products and customized solutions across all areas of sound recording, transmission and reproduction, but Sennheiser’s HD800 headphones are testament to its more than 60 years of research and development. What sets the HD800 apart is its ability to produce a more voluminous sound wave, a distinctly clearer sound, and better playback. ( Click here to read full story )
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Face Value
By Sidin Vadukut
Movement: Blancpain’s own 40F6 calibre movement comprises 398 components and 37 rubies.
The Le Brassus split-seconds flyback chronograph from Blancpain does not, as you may have noticed, have the tourbillons, minute repeaters or diamond-encrusted bezels that some think distinguish a luxurious modern mechanical watch.
But, in fact, it is a superb complicated watch that sits well on the wrist and screams class instead of carats. We asked Southampton-based Blancpain watchmaker James Avery what he thought made this timepiece exceptional. ( Click here to read full story )
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Adding a personal touch
By Neil Rodricks
Price: Rs 1,45,500
The suit jacket is essential to any man’s wardrobe, the right one for the right occasion, be it a wedding or for the office. And the effect of the suit can never be overlooked—beyond style, it exudes power and confidence. The company founded by Ermenegildo Zegna in 1910 now makes suits not only under its own brand, but also for the likes of Tom Ford and Yves Saint Laurent. ( Click here to read full story )
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Bladeless wonder
By Neil Rodricks
Electric fans haven’t changed much since they were invented in 1882—blades slicing through the air to push it forward. When the engineers at Dyson first began working on a fan without blades, they started with pressurized air, forcing it through narrow apertures to create jets.But a breakthrough came when they noticed that accelerating air over a ramp amplified it 10-20 times.
Fluid dynamics engineers spent four years ‘‘running hundreds of simulations to precisely measure and optimize the machine’s aperture and airfoil-shaped ramp”, and air fluctuations were mapped using laser doppler annometry, finally revealing the ideal ramp angle, aperture width and loop amplifier dimensions. ( Click here to read story )
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The essence of a great painting
By Anindita Ghose
Photographs: Sotheby’s, Hindustan Times
Indian painter Jehangir Sabavala worked most often in oils, creating landscapes and seascapes of rarefied beauty.
Born in an affluent Parsi family in Mumbai, he studied at Mumbai’s Sir JJ School of Art before attending art schools in London and Paris in the 1940s and 1950s. In Europe, Sabavala was influenced by Impressionism and cubism. Today, he is regarded as the greatest Indian exponent of cubism.
In a Sotheby’s auction on 15 September 2011 in New York, his serene and delicate Cobweb Cloud (1973) sold for $266,500 to a private collector from Europe. It generated much interest also because of the timing: Sabavala passed away on 2 September in Mumbai. ( Click here to read full story )
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Gin, but better
By Sidin vadukut
Since 1820, Beefeater has been known as the definitive London gin. Distilled in a brewery in Kennington, a stone’s throw from the famous Oval cricket ground, the clear, fruity, spicy spirit is indispensable in the English summer when it pairs with tonic to form a classic cocktail. In 2008, Beefeater’s master gin distiller Desmond Payne put his 40 years of experience into creating a new Super Premium spirit ‘‘for the 21st century”. However, a classic spirits recipe that has remained unchanged for decades is not to be dabbled with lightly. During his research, Payne discovered that founder James Burrough’s father was a tea merchant by royal appointment to Queen Victoria. ( Click here to read full story )
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As simple as it gets
By Neil Rodricks
Though there can be innumerable derivatives of the martini, the quintessential drink is basically gin and vermouth, in varying proportions, and served in a conical stemmed glass with either a slice of lemon or a green olive. And it is its simplicity that makes the martini such a great cocktail. It is available in both classic and flavoured variants, the latter replacing the gin with, preferably, vodka. ( Click here to read full story)
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A slice of Heaven
By Sidin Vadukut
When we asked Delhi-based pastry chef extraordinaire Kishi Arora to bake us a great cake, it took her all of five minutes to decide on her signature Chocolate Grand Marnier masterpiece. Arora, who studied her craft at the famed Culinary Institute of America and runs her Foodaholics bakery in the Capital, crafted this stacked tower of decadence out of eight layers. No visual or verbal deconstruction will do the cake justice. But we still tried. ( Click here to read full story )
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Our time has come
By Neil Rodricks
With India’s first Formula One race just around the corner, we look at three luxury watchmakers that are launching special edition chronographs in conjunction with the race.
Hublot
F1 King Power India
The Swiss luxury watchmaker is coming out with a limited edition of 200 pieces, sporting the F1 logo and the colours of the Indian flag on the dial and bracelet. The watch has several aspects made from an array of high-tech materials directly inspired by Formula One, some of which have never before been used in watchmaking. These include a ceramic bezel with a circular-grained satin finish adorned with multiple holes to represent a high performance brake disc, and a strap made from rubber and Nomex, a synthetic fibre developed by Dupont De Nemours and used to make the suits worn by F1 drivers. ( Click here to read full story )
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An insider’s guide to rogue trading
By Su Do Nim
Nick Leeson
The credit crisis and its aftermath, the European sovereign debt crisis, have ruined a generation of bankers who have entered the industry in the last five years. The closest they’ll ever get to seeing big bonuses is when reading about them in Michael Lewis’ books. However, for traders and aspiring traders who joined the industry for the noble purpose of helping others see Ferraris, Patek Philippes and luxury penthouses, all is not lost. Here is a simple, five-step process to teach the aspiring trader to play their cards right and unleash the inner rogue. ( Click here to read full story )
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Harsha Bhogle | His greatest cricket matches
Harsha Bhogle
I am trying to think of both the best matches I have ever seen, and my best days at work. For instance, in 2008, there was the third Test in Perth against Australia. This followed the extremely controversial second Test in Sydney. India came back and won at a ground where they were expected to be blown away in threeand- a-half days. I remember saying then that Shaun Tait was going to bowl at 200km per hour and he was going to destroy. But India won. So from a cricketing and sporting perspective, that was a brilliant occasion. ( Click here to read full story )
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First Published: Tue, Oct 25 2011. 01 24 AM IST