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On the spot | Some ads at least are trying to be different

On the spot | Some ads at least are trying to be different
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First Published: Mon, Feb 22 2010. 10 55 PM IST

Updated: Mon, Feb 22 2010. 10 55 PM IST
It’s as if advertising arranges itself into two piles. One that seems determined to stay firmly attached to the formula—invented in 1982—and the other that tries something new. Regrettably, a lot of the latter efforts don’t quite hold up, but they are trying. This month has a wide range of ads from both piles, among which these are worth talking about.
A slice of life, with a flavour of imperfection
Ogilvy and Mather
It’s a winning idea—that of depicting real relationships with all their weather-beaten, quirky imperfections kept intact. This brand has been consistent and has shown sensitivity and restraint.
Showing a routine moment between a husband and wife, this commercial, that captures the comfort they share in a relationship made unique by time, is spot on. Good casting, understated dialogues that do not try too hard to make a point and honesty of execution make the promise come alive. An example of how a slice of life works when the flavour of the fuzzy impreciseness of life is retained.
Not a great ad, but it’s a start nevertheless
Wieden + Kennedy
It’s a winning idea—that of depicting real relationships with all their weather-beaten, quirky imperfections kept intact. This brand has been consistent and has shown sensitivity and restraint.
Showing a routine moment between a husband and wife, this commercial, that captures the comfort they share in a relationship made unique by time, is spot on. Good casting, understated dialogues that do not try too hard to make a point and honesty of execution make the promise come alive. An example of how a slice of life works when the flavour of the fuzzy impreciseness of life is retained.
An insult to viewers’ intelligence
JWT
Personally, this is the kind of advertising I think the industry is well advised to avoid since it makes the case for regulating claims that much stronger. To sell cornflakes as an antidote for dumbness, however tongue-in-cheek the execution, is just an untenable premise.
To connect iron in the product with intelligence and to do it so ham-handedly is an insult to the viewers, er, intelligence, something the brand is clearly betting against. This is not the first Kellogg’s ad with this problem, it must be said.
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First Published: Mon, Feb 22 2010. 10 55 PM IST