×
Home Companies Industry Politics Money Opinion LoungeMultimedia Science Education Sports TechnologyConsumerSpecialsMint on Sunday
×

On the spot | Social causes: latest crutch for many brands

On the spot | Social causes: latest crutch for many brands
Comment E-mail Print Share
First Published: Mon, Mar 22 2010. 09 36 PM IST

Updated: Mon, Mar 22 2010. 09 36 PM IST
Simple and immediate: the numbers work
Dentsu
Unlike other social cause communication, such as Idea, that shows little interest in actually promoting the cause it purportedly represents, here we have a brand that showcases the cause to such an extent that one wonders about the benefit to the advertiser. That having been said, this is a campaign that works, in spite of a creative that never rises above the ordinary. The simple act of quantifying the number of tigers (1,411) lends the problem an immediacy that more clever solutions would struggle to achieve. Of course, it would work even better if the number could be counted down through the course of the campaign!
An effortless swagger that makes the brand relevant
McCann Erickson
After a very long time, a Coke ad with bite. Compared with the drippy my-mummy-makes-best-food ad that was on air till recently, this one has a whiplash sweetness to it, an effortless swagger that makes the brand relevant and contemporary. The acting is top notch and the music which slithers sinuously in the background elevates the ad into something one can watch over and over again. Imran Khan has surely the most expressive right eyebrow in the world.
Contrived emotions show disdain for real consumers
JWT
This is the kind of advertising that really gets my goat. An airy swish at strategy (Let’s uncomplicate), generic happy advertising and most annoyingly a cast and landscape that are utterly phoney. In the name of making the brand look contemporary this is a thinly veiled attempt to escape India and convert it into a fantasized version of the West. The locations, the cast, the ridiculously contrived emotion, all point to an implicit disdain for real consumers and the world they live in. What makes it worse is the stiltedness of the imagination—we see the same kind of people (girls with long curly hair, old man in vest) and locations (Tuscany-meets-the Caribbean) in ad after ad.
Comment E-mail Print Share
First Published: Mon, Mar 22 2010. 09 36 PM IST