×
Home Companies Industry Politics Money Opinion LoungeMultimedia Science Education Sports TechnologyConsumerSpecialsMint on Sunday
×

A mouthful

A mouthful
Comment E-mail Print Share
First Published: Fri, Aug 27 2010. 08 23 PM IST

Interesting twist: But the execution is not up to the mark.
Interesting twist: But the execution is not up to the mark.
Updated: Fri, Aug 27 2010. 08 23 PM IST
Spotlight | Amul Paneer
Reviewer: Titus Upputuru
With around 15 years experience in the advertising industry, Titus Upputuru, executive creative director for Saatchi and Saatchi, has worked with brands such as Sprite, KFC, Afghan Telecom and Electrolux.
With around 15 years experience in the advertising industry, Titus Upputuru, executive creative director for Saatchi and Saatchi, has worked with brands such as Sprite, KFC, Afghan Telecom and Electrolux.
Campaign
The new ad for Amul Paneer by Draftfcb+Ulka shows a mother and son in a waiting room. She puts on the fan, and a thin man goes flying in the opposite direction. She tells her son that if he doesn’t eat paneer (cottage cheese), he will end up like him.
What did you think of the ad campaign?
Interesting twist: But the execution is not up to the mark.
Ask any parent, and he or she will tell you that the toughest thing is not to make your kid learn an arithmetic formula. It’s not even making them sing a song in front of a live audience in your living room with the invocation “Beta, uncle aur aunty ko rhyme sunao (recite a rhyme for uncle and aunty)”. No, these are much easier tasks. What’s tough is getting a child to open the mouth to a spoonful of food.
So the campaign catches the insight, like fish from the bed of a river. And like the fish, the insight seems to be fresh too. In that sense, the waiting room works better than the other ad. The woman is very smart and opportunistic. She makes use of the ready example and goes on to succeed in getting the kid to open his mouth to the food. Kudos to the mother. And to the strangeness of the guy flying. Nice. At first it seemed like an ad for a strong fan and then the twist, which is a good technique. The casting of the guy is predictably funny.
The shoot seems to be very low budget, which sneaks out of the idea and stares at you. Why should films look tacky? They should delight your senses and compensate you for the time you are giving them. Unless poor execution was the idea.
How does this campaign match up with previous ads for Amul products?
Amul seemed to be in the humour territory for donkey’s, camel’s and elephant’s years put together. Except maybe for the milk. It’s fresh, single-minded and stems out of a strong insight. People do not necessarily think of categories when they see something on TV or other media. Either they will connect or they won’t. The idea should be to be able to connect and have a strong recall
value for them to remember the brand at the point of purchase.
What must an iconic brand like Amul do to stay relevant?
Ageing brands must reinvent themselves all the time. In India, Mr (Amitabh) Bachchan is a great example. Asha Bhonsle is another example. And great insights always help. Insights are human truths that help people connect to brands and make brands more human. In that sense, this campaign does try. But the look and the production should’ve been superior. Right now, it’s looking like a cheap paan masala ad. Not that of a giant, iconic brand.
As told to Gouri Shah.
gouri.s@livemint.com
Comment E-mail Print Share
First Published: Fri, Aug 27 2010. 08 23 PM IST