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To be powerful, a brand should be backed by unique content

To be powerful, a brand should be backed by unique content
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First Published: Thu, Mar 29 2007. 12 37 AM IST
Updated: Thu, Mar 29 2007. 12 37 AM IST
The last day of FICCI-Frames 2007 addressed the need to build strong media brands and adapt newer technology, especially with consumer preferences changing so rapidly.
The day, which kicked off with a session on creating sturdy brands, had industry experts stressing the need to produce compelling content which, in turn, would lead to strong brands. “It is that unique offer which eventually makes powerful brands” said Santosh Desai, managing director and CEO, Future Brands.
But what about the duplication of successful content? “Ultimately, that strong [consumer] connect only occurs when you tap into an insight that cannot be duplicated,” said Paritosh Joshi, president, advertising sales and distribution, Star TV India, of his network’s success with prime-time shows such as Kyunki Saas Bhi Kabhi Bahu Thi. “With duplicates, it’s almost like a train wreck in slow motion—you can see it coming. They [duplicates] always fail,” he said.
Some hours later, in a packed hall, actor Rahul Bose said that the industry was adapting to newer tastes by exploring uncharted territory. “The thread [in storylines] remains mainstream, but the film is moulded in a contemporary fashion to make it appealing to audiences,” he said, referring to films like Kabul Express and Rang De Basanti. Actor Anupam Kher agreed that “the hero of the film will always be the storyline”.
In a session on creating animation with global appeal, industry representatives came together to talk about how far the Indian industry had come, and how much more it needed to do still.
Sidhartha Jain, head, animation, Adlabs, said, “You’ve got to focus on cross-cultural content, instead of producing pure American content. It’s important to involve international talent—their experiences are very valuable. It might make sense to create our own style of demand.”
This was later subjected to scrutiny by Shekhar Kapur, who compared it to the Japanese art form, anime. “If you look at anime and Japanese calligraphy, you’ll notice how the strokes are similar. You can’t just create a style. It has to come from the heart.”
Hours later, the event came to a dramatic close. After three days of industry experts discussing relevant issues to polite applause, visitors stirred to life with the appearance of Abhishek Bachchan who, on his way to the event’s last discussion, smiled at a gaggle of women loudly professing their love for him.
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First Published: Thu, Mar 29 2007. 12 37 AM IST