×
Home Companies Industry Politics Money Opinion LoungeMultimedia Science Education Sports TechnologyConsumerSpecialsMint on Sunday
×

Human rights in frames: A docu-film fest

Human rights in frames: A docu-film fest
Comment E-mail Print Share
First Published: Mon, Jan 21 2008. 12 12 PM IST
Updated: Mon, Jan 21 2008. 12 12 PM IST
New Delhi: Breakthrough, an international Human Rights organization has brought the Tri Continental film festival ‘Human Rights in Frames to India for the fourth consecutive year.
Docu-film fest on human rights
=
Docu-film fest on human rights
This year, the theme that runs through the 23 shortlisted documentaries are stories from the past. These have then been ‘framed’ in varied formats within the context of human rights. At the core of every story is a poignant tale that cuts across socio-cultural barriers and relates to you at a basic human level.
Be it a filmmaker in Tunisia trying to become the next Quentin Tarantino, or the holy grail of the PLO’s official archive that is lost in a graveyard, sweat shop workers in a clothes factory of China or a genocide survivor in Rwanda — human rights form the thread with which all the films have been sutured
Inaugurating the fest, Shiela Dikshit, chief minister Delhi said, “These films open up a world which many of us are unaware of. It serves the purpose of creating awareness, sensitization and building powerful public opinion. It also provides a sharing ground for victims and survivors. We would like to support such initiatives with the hope that the messages in these films reach a larger audience, evokes greater debate and breaks stereotyped, narrow mindsets”.
The opening film at the festival was the Asia premiere of the much acclaimed film about juvenile prisoners in Iran, It’s Always Late for Freedom, by Iranian director, Mehraad Oskouei.
Parvez Sharma’s jury award winning docu-film, A Jihad for Love traced a story about spiritually devout gay Muslims and evoked much debate after the screening. The film talks about people’s choices for alternative sexuality without relinquishing their religion. It was given the jury award by an international jury that comprised of Peggy Chiao, Sarmeen Obaid, Amrit Gangar, Meenakshi Shedde and Maithili Rao
Other celebrated films that were premiered included Movement e(Revolution) in Africa highlighting the rich dance heritage of the continent; the multi-award winner, China Blue, a clandestine film about sweatshop workers; and The Hands of Che Guevara, a search for the missing hands of the revolutionary leader.
“We hope to emerge as the perfect vehicle that can introduce global human rights issues to Indian youth,” said Alika Khosla, Breakthrough’s associate director. “Not only does it play to sold-out venues across major cities, but the festival draws audiences of thousands as it travels through campuses and small towns throughout the year,” she added.
Breakthrough, as a human right organization uses education, media and popular culture to transform public attitudes and works through affiliate offices in India with a focus on women’s rights and the United States on immigrant rights. It has done substantial work in the field of HIV and AIDS.
Today is the concluding day of the festival at IHC, New Delhi after which it would move to Mumbai ( 25-27 Jan); Bangalore ( 1-3 Feb) and Kolkata (8-10 Feb )
With additional inputs by Taru Bahl
Comment E-mail Print Share
First Published: Mon, Jan 21 2008. 12 12 PM IST