Asian Paints’ first all-woman applicator team defies stereotypes in a digital film

Apart from digital campaign, Asian Paints is conducting on-ground activation to reach and inspire unskilled labour across India


Asian Paints has established 11 academies situated in major metros. Photo: Satish Kaushik/Mint
Asian Paints has established 11 academies situated in major metros. Photo: Satish Kaushik/Mint

New Delhi: Asian Paints Ltd has rolled out a digital campaign to promote its vocational training institution, Colour Academy. The film is an inspiring true story of a young woman who defies stereotypes to learn designer wall painting. Uploaded on the company’s YouTube channel on 7 July, the digital film has garnered over 300,000 views so far.

Made by Ogilvy & Mather, the digital campaign is an extension of the company’s existing ‘Naam hoga, toh kaam hoga’ recruitment drive launched in 2014 which used radio, print and on-ground mediums to inform people about the institution.

The film opens with a monologue by Saroj, a 20-something woman who lives in Mumbai and works as a beautician. She introduces herself as an ambitious working woman who also values the importance of having a family. One day, her uncle who works as a contractor visits her house. Upon seeing the beautiful rangoli she has made, he suggests that she explore the artistic side in her and join Asian Paints Colour Academy. Saroj manages to convince a few women from her neighbourhood to enroll in the course and form an all-woman applicator team.

The over-five-minute-long video is held together by an engaging narrative and background score by Rohit Sharma—best known for his work in movies such as Ship of Theseus and Buddha in a Traffic Jam.

“The idea of the campaign is to make people aware of the possibility to help someone currently unskilled to take training and be skilled enough to start earning a respectable livelihood; even if she is a woman,” said Amit Syngle, president, sales, marketing and technology, Asian Paints.

Apart from digital, the company is conducting on-ground activation to reach and inspire unskilled labour across India.

In an email response about the campaign, the Ogilvy spokesperson said, “At its inception, Naam hoga, toh kaam hoga was a standalone activity mostly driven through on-ground activations and radio spots. It generated outstanding recruitment figures—Colour Academy trained 25,000 professionals in 2015. This figure was big enough for us to start digging for more such inspiring stories and ‘Saroj’ became the first one out of the lot. We have played this video at labour mandis to recruit interested participants from small towns and villages.”

The Colour Academy provides training for over eight different vocational courses for different skill sets like Basic Painter Course, Interior Designer Finishes, Waterproofing, Wood finishes, etc. The ‘Basic Painter Course’ is also certified by National Skill Development Corporation (NSDC).

After setting up the first Colour Academy in 2002, Asian Paints has established 11 academies situated in major metros. In addition, there are 10 mobile Colour Academies operating in far-flung areas of Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Gujarat, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Punjab and the seven North-eastern states.

Meanwhile, advertising experts have given a big thumbs up to this documentary-style film. Deepak Singh, chief creative officer, The Social Street, noted that in a lengthy script, the treatment of the narrative holds the film together.

“It is exactly what’s been done. The casting, music and dialogue delivery, everything is apt adding to the feel and gets the message across,” he said.

According to Emmanuel Upputuru, founder and chief integration officer, ITSA Brand Innovations, the film has been shot almost in a Doordarshan-style narrative. “Well done Asian Paints!” he said, adding “It is a good initiative, relevant for the brand, the customers and makes the brand look good.”

READ MORE