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IPL team Deccan Chargers seeks trademark rights

IPL team Deccan Chargers seeks trademark rights
PTI
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First Published: Thu, May 07 2009. 03 29 PM IST
Updated: Thu, May 07 2009. 03 29 PM IST
New Delhi: Deccan Chargers, one of the Indian Premier League’s franchises, has filed multiple applications before Government authorities seeking exclusive trademark rights for its name.
“The Deccan Chargers have filed for trademark protection in multiple classes aiming for an expanded brand portfolio” Kochhar & Co Partner Rodney D. Ryder, who is legal adviser to the Deccan Chargers, said.
The application, filed by Deccan Chargers Sporting Ventures Pvt Ltd, for the exclusivity of trademarks has been sought under various categories, including Class 25 (deals with clothing, footwear) and Class 28 (games, playthings), Ryder added.
Interestingly, the trademark rights are not only limited to the sports-related classes but the firm is also seeking exclusivity of the brand under many other classes, including tobacco, smokers’ article, beers, coffee tea, sugar and bread.
“(Trademark) protection helps ensure exclusivity and protect ownerships rights. The brand is more valuable when protected. Business partners, franchisees, customers, all know that the rights are exclusive,” Ryder further said.
Significantly, the Essel group-promoted Indian Cricket League (ICL) has also sought trademark of its different brands before the government authorities.
The Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), the apex governing body for the sport in the country, has objected to dozens of twenty-twenty related trademark applications filed by Essel Sports Private Ltd.
Essel Sports is a part of Subhash Chandra-led Zee group, which is the force behind the ICL. The ICL runs parallel to the BCCI’s Indian Premier League (IPL), although both the leagues conduct cricket tournaments in the 20-20 format, where each team is allowed to play for 20 overs.
The two groups have been often clashed over issues ranging from contracting of players to telecast rights and the latest showdown seems to be on trademarks.
The BCCI has now opposed Essel’s move to get registered in its (Essel) name various trademarks involving phrases like Twenty-Twenty and its many other combinations, as per the information available from the Controller General of Patents Designs and Trademarks under the ministry of commerce and industry.
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First Published: Thu, May 07 2009. 03 29 PM IST