Women pick high earners for spouses; men not particular about women’s jobs

Most women prefer men with jobs in investment banking. Doctors and IT professionals comes next, according to Shaadi.com


The career of the potential spouse is a top criterion for women while choosing a partner; it helps them gauge how smart he would be and also how much he would earn.
The career of the potential spouse is a top criterion for women while choosing a partner; it helps them gauge how smart he would be and also how much he would earn.

Bengaluru: A 28-year-old Thane resident, who didn’t want to be named, got engaged to an investment banker recently. She said his job played a big role in her decision.

“I used the finance industry as a filter, because I know some of the smartest people end up majoring in finance. Also, I feel a person from investment banking is more likely to be highly intelligent and also have a certain amount of financial stability,” she said.

On the other hand, 27-year-old Delhi-based Mohit Gulati, who works in a private bank, said the profession of his prospective partner didn’t play a big role in his decision.

Men and women do think of jobs quite differently.

Most women preferred men with jobs in investment banking. Doctors and IT professionals came next, according to matrimony website Shaadi.com, which has 35 million users.

Investment banking professionals are the most highly paid professionals. They earn as much as Rs.25 lakh on joining a firm and including bonuses their annual compensation can go up to Rs.75 lakh.

The career of the potential spouse is a top criterion for women while choosing a partner; it helps them gauge how smart he would be and also how much he would earn.

But it also reflects the kind of working woman she could be.

Working women are basically of three types, says Saundarya Rajesh, founder of Avtar Career Creators, and Flexi Careers India, an HR firm focused on women.

The first type is a career primary, for whom a career is most important; they constitute only 15% of the female workforce. The second type makes up the career and home segment, which account for 60-65% of the workforce. For them it is all about balancing the two fronts.

The final segment is the home primary, and they account for 25 to 30% of the workforce. These are women who don’t want to work.

“For the last two layers of people especially, jobs of their prospective groom become very important as they seek financial stability in men as these women know they make go on a temporary or permanent break,” says Rajesh.

Men like Gulati on the other hand, are not very particular about the profession of their spouse. Most men picked women who had a bank job or were self-employed (running a crèche or boutique), according to Shaadi.com.

“For 63% of men the professional background of the woman does not matter,” said Aditya Save, chief marketing officer, shaadi.com. They prefer women who are educated and articulate and at the same time are able to balance home and work, said Save.

Men, however, chose differently, when they are looking to date a woman.

Sixty-six percent of men who used the online dating app Trulymadly wanted to casually date women who worked in the fashion industry. Women in media, advertising, public relations and hospitality came next.

The job preference of women who look to date, on the other hand, is not entirely different from the profiles they choose when they look to marry.

Trulymadly’s data showed that over 80% of women picked men in information technology (IT) jobs and over 70% chose men in consulting followed by advertising and PR and healthcare.

The app, which was launched in September 2014, has 2.8 million users; 18 to 21 year olds count for 40% of its user base, while 22 to 26 year olds make up another 40%.

On analysing the way men and women navigate the app, and looking at what aspects of the profile men clicked on the most, Sachin Bhatia, CEO and co-founder of the dating app said that men tend to make a decision to ‘like’ a profile based on the profile picture.

“Women from industries like fashion and hospitality tend to be well-groomed, and they end up getting ‘liked’ the most by men,” he said.

As for young women, they are more discerning, said Bhatia. “While the picture is important to them as well, women also look at height, education and employment, before hitting ‘like’,” said Bhatia.