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A love for the animal form

A love for the animal form
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First Published: Fri, Jan 09 2009. 01 12 AM IST
Updated: Fri, Jan 09 2009. 01 12 AM IST
At first they look like something a child may have drawn. But draw closer and you realize there is wit, humor and a vibrant story in each one. Artist Premola Ghose’s gang of animals, who ran away from Ranthambore, come alive against various solemn back drops in her paintings exhibiting in New Delhi.
Ghose, a children’s author, writes and paints about a group of fictitious animals that moved out of the forest and go to the city. ”I keep the animals as a central core and then bring in the other things. Whatever I see, is in a sense produced here,” says Ghose.
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In stark contrast to Ghose’s animals are Punam Zutshi’s black and white abstract inscapes. Done in black ink with pens and quills, they draw upon the onlooker’s inner nature to come alive.
“I don’t start with a visual image. I really work with this first stroke and then it builds up,” says Zutshi. Many of Zutshi’s works look like landscapes.
The paintings that are on sale have art lovers excited.
“It’s for the child in every one of us. And if you look at the painting you can actually see many layers within that painting. Many conversations happening in that painting,” says Poonam Bevli Shani, an artist and admirer of Ghose’s work.
“This kind of genre and colours and paper that she uses it appeals to something which is undying in each one of us. If I were to sum it up it is the modern version of Panchatantra,” says M Varadarajan, chief advisor at Osian’s, one of India’s first art funds.
Ghose say she enjoys drawing animals rather than the human form.
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First Published: Fri, Jan 09 2009. 01 12 AM IST