Ad Review: Go back to the core idea for the ad

Ad Review: Go back to the core idea for the ad
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First Published: Wed, Aug 15 2007. 01 21 AM IST

The brand: Yamaha Alba Motorcycle
The brand: Yamaha Alba Motorcycle
Updated: Wed, Aug 15 2007. 01 21 AM IST
Reviewer
Josy Paul, national creative director, JWT India, picks an ad he doesn’t like and explains how he would have done it.
Spot
The latest campaign for Yamaha Alba, the motorcycle from Yamaha Motor India Pvt Ltd, features a model asking a guy on the Yamaha for a lift—but he rides past. So, in a fit of rebellion, the woman walks into a tattoo parlour and gets a tattoo of the bike on her back and says, “I’ve got one too!”
The brand: Yamaha Alba Motorcycle
Why I don’t like it
This ad is so bad that it sticks in the mind like a bad dream. The tattoo is a protest, in a way, because the guy didn’t let her get on to the bike. What next? If he doesn’t share his PS2 (Play Station 2) with her, is she going to get a tattoo of that too? Or if he refuses to share his house with her, is she going to get the floorplan tattooed on to her body? This is probably the first time I’ve seen anyone make a tattoo look uncool.
The idea is really absurd, and what really gets my goat is that the model that is supposed to embody the new age woman, who has a fiery spirit and can take a challenge, looks like a desperate dimwit.
The ad is a two-dimensional characterization which does not draw from any real-life observation or insight. When I watch it, it makes me say, “Gosh! I’m so glad I didn’t do that ad”—and I’ve my share of bad work as well.
How I would have done it
I would have changed the advertisement completely.
Yamaha is a fantastic brand, which has been represented in the past by some good advertising. I might have revisited those themes again. They need to go back to the core idea; in this case, I assume, the idea is about a man being so engrossed in his bike that he doesn’t notice the woman, who resorts to extreme measures to get his attention—that is where the creative task is.
One suggestion is that she chases after him shouting “Thief, stop, thief!” which gets the crowd chasing him and eventually, she forgives him. However I have a better idea: The entire team responsible for this advertisement should make an appearance on television, right after the ad is screened, and apologise to viewers. That would make for a wonderful public service advertisement.
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First Published: Wed, Aug 15 2007. 01 21 AM IST