Cadbury launches new ad for Diwali

For Mondelez India, the challenge each year during the festive season is to get more and more Indian consumers to look beyond traditional sweets


The advertisement was driven by the insight that the younger generation looks at festivals as a bit of a repetitive chore, something they have to do, and tick off their list each year.
The advertisement was driven by the insight that the younger generation looks at festivals as a bit of a repetitive chore, something they have to do, and tick off their list each year.

Mumbai: Brands are riding on the festival season to launch new campaigns to woo consumers, and chocolate brand Cadbury from Mondelez India is no different. It has launched a new television commercial featuring actor Dalip Tahil (Watch here) to kick off its campaign for the season.

Created by Contract Advertising Mumbai and shot by film production house Nirvana Films, the new ad for Cadbury Celebrations Rich Dry Fruit Collection shows grown up children gathering at their parents’ house for Diwali. The entire family, including children and grandchildren, are a little sentimental as the father, played by actor Dalip Tahil, has decided to sell the home they grew up in. As they recount memories of their childhood, they ask their father to reconsider his decision. The father says that his decision has been driven by the fact that his children hardly come visiting. However, the minute he announces that he’s changed his mind as all his children are under the same roof, the mood turns festive. The ad ends with the tag line, Iss Diwali Khushiya Le Chalo.

The advertisement was driven by the insight that the younger generation looks at festivals as a bit of a repetitive chore, something they have to do, and tick off their list each year. “There was a need to infuse life and fun into the festival, and positioning the product as something that brings joy was the perfect opportunity,” said Kapil Mishra, executive vice-president and executive creative director, Contract Advertising, Mumbai.

For Mondelez India, the challenge each year during the festive season is to get more and more Indian consumers to look beyond traditional sweets and view chocolate as a contemporary yet appropriate offering to mark the celebrations.

“Although traditional sweets have been an integral part of every festival being celebrated in India, we have regularly innovated and created consumption occasions, thereby converting the mithai loving Indians to adapt to newer flavours of chocolates. Rising disposable incomes, growing media exposure, changing lifestyles and a young population’s growing affinity for indulgence has set the stage to transform India into one of the world’s fastest growing chocolate markets,” said Prashant Peres, director marketing (chocolates), Mondelez India.

He said that increasingly the Indian consumer is purchasing premium and finer chocolates for festive consumption and gifting. “There has been a rise in acceptance of the bitter-sweet taste of dark chocolate as well which is a significant move away from traditional tastes for the country,” he added.

Celebrations was a brand created by Cadbury to make chocolates part of the mithai gifting ritual during festivals like Diwali. “This meant that the first ads had to tick many boxes—like literally showing the occasion and the act of gifting. This worked as Celebrations was a new and relevant offering. However, all the ads, ever since, have followed the code religiously. Even the baseline reinforces the gifting agenda— Khushiyan Le Chalo. All these rules don’t leave room for creative leaps but only creative adjustments,” said Raghu Bhat, founder director at ad agency Scarecrow Communications Ltd.

Referring to the new ad, he said that the grim possibility (of a father selling his house) is transformed into a happy resolution after a 14-second trip down memory lane where one of the memories involves a Cadbury chocolate. “For an audience that increasingly seems to relish authenticity, it might be too much to digest,” said Bhat, explaining that the dramatic transformation due to a product—a time-tested ad technique, admittedly—is no longer seen as credible. “Due to ads getting shorter, it might be better to focus directly on the final state (like Cadbury Silk shows enjoyment) rather than the journey from ‘kinda sad’ to ‘very happy’ which is the traditional template for Celebrations ads,” he added.

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