Ready, set, think: Mind-controlled drones race to the future

Technology behind Brain Control Interfaces is now proven, although still primitive, and the dorky headgear that makes it possible has recently become available online for a few hundred dollars


Computer scientists in Gainesville, Florida, figure the best way to promote brain Control interfaces by pairing it with airborne drones. Photo: Reuters
Computer scientists in Gainesville, Florida, figure the best way to promote brain Control interfaces by pairing it with airborne drones. Photo: Reuters

Gainesville: Scientists at the University of Florida want to make mind-control much more popular.

What we used to call telekinesis—the ability to move objects with the power of thought—is no longer just the stuff of magic shows. The technology behind Brain Control Interfaces is now proven, although still primitive, and the dorky headgear that makes it possible has recently become available online for a few hundred dollars.

Computer scientists in Gainesville, Florida, figure the best way to promote this technology is by pairing it with another popular development: airborne drones. They just staged the first of what they hope will become an annual intercollegiate competition, racing drones through willpower.

Organizers hope these races will eventually bring a whole new meaning to mind-control, expanding the way we work, play and live.