Burberry’s September issue

Inspired by Orlando, the gender-bending 1928 novel by Virginia Woolf, the collection blurs ideas of the masculine and feminine, casual and formal, night and day


Burberry began a new chapter earlier this week with its show at London Fashion Week under the brand’s see-now-buy-now initiative.

Inspired by Orlando, the gender-bending 1928 novel by Virginia Woolf, the collection blurs ideas of the masculine and feminine, casual and formal, night and day—thus mirroring “then and now”, both of the brand and global fashion culture. Highlights included blends of denim, cashmere and pyjama silks, deconstructed trench coats, coats and jackets (including The Cavalry Jacket, The Military Tailcoat and The Parade Jacket), field jackets, pea coats, regimental capes, pyjama-style trousers and ruffle-neck shirts in pink, green, yellow, orange, brown and blue, and in leopard and floral prints.

The Bridle Bag comes as a new, exciting accessory for men and women.

There are other important takeaways from the show. One, this is the first time that the 160-year-old British label, embattled with tumbling profits over the last 12 months, presented its womenswear and menswear collections together, thus reducing the number of four annual shows down to two. Two, as Burberry announced in February, the entire collection was made immediately available for purchase globally, online and in-store. It may be a huge gamble, in terms of challenging the traditional fashion system of seasonal dressing. But if it works, this trend could change the business of fashion and that will include nipping the plans of plagiarists.

“I like traditional, beautiful, slow crafts, but we are living in a moment that changes everything…and speed is everything,” AFP quoted Burberry creative director Christopher Bailey as saying. Bailey resigned as the brand’s chief executive this July.

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