More by Mario Botta

More by Mario Botta
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First Published: Thu, Mar 29 2007. 12 13 AM IST

Updated: Thu, Mar 29 2007. 12 13 AM IST
Chapel of St Mary of the Angels, Monte Tamaro, Ticino (1990-96)
This stone and concrete fortress-like structure lies atop a mountain, 1,600m above sea level, near the town of Lugano in southern Switzerland, and is accessible by cable car. It was commissioned by the owner of the cableway, Egidio Cattaneo, as a tribute to his late wife. Botta collaborated with artist Enzo Cucchi, who painted some beautiful frescos inside.
St John the Baptist Chapel, Mogno, Switzerland (1992-98)
The original 17th century church was destroyed in an avalanche in 1986 and Botta rebuilt it as a gift to the village. He depicted the relationship between the building—as an expression of man’s daily labour and his very presence on the land—and the boundless power of nature. The subtle play between a huge stone wall and the lightness of the glass roof is a testimony to the survival of the building, which is designed as a bulwark for the village, in defiance of the mountain.
Museum Jean Tinguely, Basel (1993-96)
The building is situated along the eastern side of the 19th century park, adjacent to the Rhine river and at one end of a highway bridge. Thus, the new building is an attempt to rejuvenate the urban void between the city’s 20th century fabric and the edge of the highway. A particular feature of the internal space is the sunlight that from time to time falls in unusual configurations on the various exhibition floors.
Cardada Cableway, Ticino, Switzerland (2000)
The new Orselina-Cardada-Cimetta aerial cableway takes visitors up Mount Cardada (1,332m above sea level), in southern Switzerland. Botta designed the chairlift station, resembling a translucent lantern, the pavilion at the top of the mountain and the tear-drop shaped cable car.
Bus Terminal, Lugano, Switzerland (2001-02)
One of the main features of the bus terminal is the canopy that changes colour with the season, turning blue, white, pink and violet in turn. This effect has been achieved by using translucent material (plexiglas) to cover the structure, allowing for filtered light. The given effect of the translucent surface characterizes the whole spot of the central bus station—offering wide, bright and weather-protected spaces during the day or at night, transmitting a shining effect of white and coloured light sources, which are set within the steel structure.
Courtesy: http://www.botta.ch/, http://vrm.vrway.com/issue08/MARIO_BOTTA_A_VIRTUAL_EXPLORATION.html
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First Published: Thu, Mar 29 2007. 12 13 AM IST
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