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Stock stories on celluloid

Stock stories on celluloid
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First Published: Mon, Mar 12 2007. 12 35 AM IST
Updated: Mon, Mar 12 2007. 12 35 AM IST
Here is a list of some legendary Hollywood movies that have brilliantly depicted the myriad emotions, currents of fear and greed that grip all those who enter the world of stock markets.
Boiler Room, directed by Ben Younger (2000)
This is one of the few movies to get an endorsement from a securities regulatory authority—North American Securities Administrators Association. The film gives an inside account of the fraudulent activities of brokerage houses. Seth Davis (Giovanni Ribisi) is a college dropout who finds employment with a brokerage firm. Davis is a success and the huge pay packet surprises even him. He delves into the operations and unearths some ugly truths.
Barbarians at the Gate, directed by Glenn Jordan
This movie is based on a book of the same name by Tom Wolfe and depicts one of the biggest buyouts in the corporate history. It is about the leveraged buyout of the cigarette company RJR Nabisco by two rival firms.
Other People’s Money, directed by Norman Jewison (1991)
It isn’t exactly about the stock market but about a corporate raider Laurence Garfield (Danny DeVito) who tries to acquire a wires and a cable company. Desperate, the company’s president Andrew Jorgenson (Gregory Peck) ropes in his stepdaughter Kate (Penelope Ann Miller), a lawyer. Soon, Garfield finds himself falling for the beautiful Kate.
Wall Street, directed by Oliver Stone (1987)
This all-time classic reveals the extent of greed that prevailed in Wall Street in the ’80s. Michael Douglas plays Gordon Gekko, a ruthless Wall Street raider, who teaches a young broker Bud Fox (Charlie Sheen) the secrets of insider trading. Fox follows Gekko’s “greed is good” philosophy and soon finds himself in the midst of black business deals, quick money and women. Ultimately, he has to face the possibility of endangering his father’s white-collar job because of charges of insider trading.
Trading Places, directed by John Landis (1983)
This comedy depicts the lifestyle of two rich commodity traders who make strange bets. Their latest wager involves trading places —between a criminal Billy Ray Valentine (Eddie Murphy) and a broker in their firm, Louis Winthorpe III (Dan Aykroyd). They contend that the change of circumstances would make Valentine a good man and Winthorpe a crook. Suddenly, Winthorpe finds himself without a job and a home
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First Published: Mon, Mar 12 2007. 12 35 AM IST
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