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The Timeout Mint planner

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First Published: Fri, Jul 27 2007. 01 10 AM IST
Updated: Fri, Jul 27 2007. 01 10 AM IST
DELHI
Art
Group Show at Nature Morte
Until 28 July
The show has a sombre, surreal tone—mostly black and white or muted colour schemes dominate the urban feel of works by Anita Dube, Seher Shah, Samit Das and the Raqs Media Collective (Jeebesh Bagchi, Monica Narula and Shuddhabrata Sengupta of Sarai). The show is largely dominated by Seher Shah’s intriguing series of prints that explore the Muslim identity. Shah, originally from Pakistan, now works in New York and is showing in India for the first time. Samit Das’ untitled works are collages composed of photographs, precise drawings and abstract painting that press against the pane of the frame. Anita Dube’s photographs are large, surreal works that highlight parts of the human body—hands, eyes and mouths. Raqs’ offerings are a mixed bag of some old and new work. 11am-7pm (Mon-Sat). Nature Morte, A-1, Neeti Bagh (4174-0215). Free.
The Legend of Bengal Art
31 July-5 August
A show organized by De Montage Art Gallery, which attempts to answer the question of what constitutes Bengal Art. The exhibition includes works by Rabindranath Tagore, Abanindranath Tagore, Gaganendranath Tagore, Jamini Roy, Atul Bose, Ramkinkar Baij, Shipra Bhattacharya, Aditya Basak, Subrata Gangopadhyay, Ramananda Bandopadhyay and Suman Roy. Galerie Romain Rolland Alliance Française, 72, Lodhi Estate (2625-7574). Free.
Theatre
Mallaika Sherraffat@oldagehome.com
30 July
A musical comedy in Hindi, Urdu, English and Punjabi on the flip side of ageing, Sarita Vohra’s play is a tongue-in-cheek commentary on contemporary issues confronting the aged. It weaves in topical issues such as the sealing of commercial properties in New Delhi and even nursery admissions. 6.30pm (duration: 1 hour, 30 minutes). India International Centre Auditorium, 40, Max Mueller Marg, Lodhi Estate (2461-9431). Free.
Out & About
Youth Parliament’s Fifth Anniversary Celebrations
30 July
The 800-member Youth Parliament, which works with young people in New Delhi, celebrates its fifth anniversary with a music concert by Artistes Unlimited, a photography exhibition of five young photographers, screening of documentary films, art installations and the release of the organization’s literary magazine, The Bridge. Call Youth Parliament (4155-1222) for details. 8pm. India Habitat Centre, Lodhi Road (2468-2222). Free.
Film
Chalo School
1 August
The film tracks a day in the lives of five children in three different states and settings and takes us on a journey into the challenges faced by them. In collaboration with the Aga Khan Foundation. 7pm. India Habitat Centre, Lodhi Road (2468-2222). Free.
Dance
Nimble feet: Kristina Dolonina and Madina AndassovaKristina Dolonina and Madina Andassova
2 August
Kristina Dolonina and Madina Andassova, disciples of Shovana Narayan, present duets in ‘teen taal’, ‘jhap taal’ and ‘dhamaar’, as well as ‘abhinaya’ compositions on vaishnava and sufi themes. This event is part of the annual Arpan festival organized by Narayan’s organization, Asavari. 7pm. India Habitat Centre, Lodhi Road (2468-2222). Free.
Music
Galeej Gurus + Half Step Down + Bittersweet Oblivion
2 August
The Kingfisher Pubrockfest 2007 is a seven-city 30-gig rock festival presented by Rock Street Journal in association with Levi’s and NDTV Lifestyle. The festival kicked off on 15 July in New Delhi with performances by Joint Family, Amidst The Chaos and Frequency, among others. Expect a rock ‘n’ roll night with the Bangalore-based progressive-funk outfit Galeej Gurus, our very own blues brothers Half Step Down and psychedelic-experimental outfit Bittersweet Oblivion. Blues, N-18, Outer Circle, Connaught Place (4152-3001). Cover charge: Rs100. Gates open at 7.30pm.
MUMBAI
Out & About
Gulf Monsoon Scooter Rally
29 July
Imagine 40 men, aged 18-65, riding through the city on a Sunday morning, making a pit stop at Vashi and then speeding their way across a gravelly 35km dirt track across Navi Mumbai as they race for trophies, cash prizes and congratulatory backslaps. Now, imagine them all doing it on their trusty Bajaj and Kinetic scooters.
For 17 years, Shrikant Karani of Sportscraft India has been organizing the annual Gulf Monsoon Scooter Rally, the only one of its kind in the country, and has attracted scooter-racing enthusiasts from Mumbai, Pune, Nashik and Kolhapur, each eager to push the limits of their street vehicles.
This year’s course will wind around Vashi, Kombadbhuje, Karghar, Vahal-Waghilwada, Ohvale and CBD Belapur. Participants include three fathers pitting their mild machines against their sons’. For those who want to cheer, the race kicks off at Our Lady’s Home, near St Paul’s Church, Dadar at 8.30am. Call Sportscraft (2367-7631) or email sportscraft@hotmail.com. Log on to www.sportscraftindia.com.
Art
Spy
30 July-4 August
Bose Krishnamachari curates a show with works by C.K. Rajan, Dia Mehta, Prasad Raghavan and Simran Mehta Agarwal. “The works are put together almost like a chess game,” said Bose. “It’s a super-intelligent kind of work.” 11am-7pm (Mon-Sat). The Guild, MG Road, next to Jehangir Art Gallery, Kala Ghoda (2284-4484).
Film
Madame Brouette
31 July
A superbly balanced social drama from Senegal. Told partly in flashback, it concerns the investigation into the murder of a police officer, presumably by his enraged wife Madame Brouette. Brouette runs a fruit cart through the streets of Niayes and, despite her lowly means and responsibilities, is known as a defender of women abused by their husbands or lovers. Director Moussa Sene Absa takes us through her difficult working days, her family and social life to throw light on her condition. Delicately mocking, passionate and delightful. 6.30pm (duration: 1 hour, 34 minutes). Alliance Française, Theosophy Hall, 40, New Marine Lines (2203-5993). Free.
Music
Janam Janam Ka Saath Hain
31 July
For many Hindi film music fans, the last day of July is a time for both sorrow and celebration. 31 July 1980 will always be remembered as the day they lost Mohammed Rafi, one of the country’s best-loved playback singers. Every year since then, they have marked the date by digging out and listening to his old records or by singing along with his most famous songs at one of the many tribute concerts organized during the last week of July. Catch this concert presented by Golden Greats of the most popular songs of Mohammed Rafi on his 27th death anniversary. 8.30pm. Kalidas Auditorium, Maha Kavi Kaldias Natyamandir, PK Road, Mulund (W) (2561-2722). Tickets: Rs250, Rs200, Rs150, Rs100, Rs75. Call 2528-3468 for details.
Leipzig Philharmonic Chamber Orchestra
31 July-1 August
Founded in 2001, the Leipzig Philharmonic Chamber Orchestra performs an extensive repertoire that ranges from baroque to contemporary. The first of their two concerts in Mumbai will include works by Mendelssohn, Brahms and Beethoven. The second day will feature works by Bach, Mozart and Hadyn. 7pm. Tata Theatre, NCPA, near Hilton Tower, Nariman Point (6622-3737). Tickets: Rs600, Rs400, Rs200, Rs100.
RECOMMENDED
Music
DELHI
Shivkumar Sharma + Channulal Mishra
27 July
Banyan Tree brings the Barkha Ritu festival to the Capital as part of its five-city programme. This year, the line-up includes Pandit Hariprasad Chaurasia, Pandit Satyasheel Deshpande, Pandit Vishwa Mohan Bhatt and Ustad Rashid Khan. The show begins with a recital by santoor legend Shivkumar Sharma. Acknowledged as one of the country’s, if not the world’s, greatest musical innovators, Sharma virtually created the santoor as we know it today. The second half of the evening will see a performance by Varanasi vocalist Channulal Mishra (all details are tentative). For more information, contact the venue. Kamani Auditorium, 1, Copernicus Marg, Mandi House (2338-8084). Free.
Film
MUMBAI
Jashn-e-Azadi
27 July
“Freedom’s terrible thirst” is how poet Agha Shahid Ali referred to it in his collection, ‘The Country without a Post Office’. But to many Kashmiris, the wave that has swept through the state over the past 18 long years is the ‘tehreek’, or struggle. The many meanings of ‘azadi’ in Kashmir are the subject of Sanjay Kak’s new documentary, ‘Jashn-e-Azadi’. Huge crowds attend the funerals of militant leaders, their cries resounding even through the grainy audio of the original VCR recordings. Then the camera goes behind the rhetoric, where the TV crews rarely venture. Teary-eyed mothers show smiling photographs of their dead sons to members of the J&K Coalition of Civil Society, who are conducting a survey of deaths and disappearances: 60,000 were killed, at least 10,000 “disappeared”.
“I realized that the Arabic word ‘shahid’ also means ‘to bear witness’,” says Kak. “And so, everyone in Kashmir is a possible shahid, a martyr to the moment.” 6.30pm (duration: 2 hours, 19 minutes). Bhupesh Gupta Bhavan, Leningrad Chowk, opposite Shaman Ford showroom, Ravindra Natya Mandir, Prabhadevi (2437-4930). Free
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First Published: Fri, Jul 27 2007. 01 10 AM IST
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