Casio’s underwater rig

Casio’s underwater rig
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First Published: Wed, Apr 11 2007. 12 08 AM IST

Updated: Wed, Apr 11 2007. 12 08 AM IST
What good is a digital camera if it cannot travel underwater? For those of you adventure sports enthusiasts who tread the underwater world, there is good news. Casio has unveiled Casio Exilim snorkel housing EWC-10 protective casing for its two digital compact cameras, EX-Z75 and EX-Z65. The EWC-10 has hit the stores and with a depth rating of 3m (10 feet), it may not set the underwater world ablaze, but is good enough to let you experiment with underwater photographs. The additional plus point is that it protects the camera from sand as well, a good thing when you are on a beach.
Operating the camera with the case is pretty simple. The individual control keys can be found on the housing itself and there is no discernible loss in the quality of photographs. Getting used to it may take a little while and you could practise in controlled environments like buckets or swimming pools. At the moment, no pricing information is available, but rest assured, it won’t cost more than the camera!
Google accused of plagiarism
In its haste towards world domination, Google has made a mistake. It plagiarized part of a programme developed by Sohu.com in a recently released Chinese software tool it called its own. But, true to Google form, it also accepted the mistake and has issued an apology. “We want to face this problem directly and thus apologize to our users and Sohu,” Google said in a post on its Chinese-language blog.
This is perhaps part of the trouble of the world going “open source”. How this part of the competitor’s programme got into its code has not been explained. Google, however, had said earlier that it did use non-Google database resources to develop the Pinyin Input Method Editor (IME). The Pinyin IME, which lets users type Chinese by entering the Pinyin Romanization equivalents for characters and words, was found to have striking similarities to that developed by Sohu. In fact, it was detected because of the same mistakes in both programmes.
Pinyin IMEs rely on a dictionary of Chinese words and names, matched with their Pinyin equivalents, to predict which characters a user needs. In the case of Google’s IME, the first version of the software contained the names of Sohu engineers, who had put their names in the Sohu dictionary for personal convenience! And that’s how the theft came to light.
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First Published: Wed, Apr 11 2007. 12 08 AM IST
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