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Quick Edit | Gagged for 140 characters

Quick Edit | Gagged for 140 characters
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First Published: Wed, Sep 23 2009. 12 25 AM IST
Updated: Wed, Sep 23 2009. 12 25 AM IST
When a glum-faced Shashi Tharoor emerged from a meeting with Sonia Gandhi on Tuesday, it seemed as if his Tweeting days had come to an end. At least, he is not about to post “cattle class” comments in a hurry.
It has been what journalists call a developing story. Earlier this month, India’s junior foreign minister had made some careless comments on Twitter.
A storm of the teacup kind was the result. The minister was alternatively called a crusader in the musty corridors of South Block as well as a person out of touch with political realities.
In this age, it is much simpler to reach audiences through blogs and Twitter. They offer informality and ease that are unlikely in a sarkari press note. But such ease and informality tend to put off the party spokesperson class and the older generation of leaders.
You could argue about the insensitivity of the “cattle class” comment till the cows come home. But the controversy is a telling comment on how we have become a humourless society.
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First Published: Wed, Sep 23 2009. 12 25 AM IST