Survey warns against high volatility in stock market

Survey warns against high volatility in stock market
PTI
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First Published: Tue, Feb 27 2007. 03 16 PM IST
Updated: Tue, Feb 27 2007. 03 16 PM IST
New Delhi: High volatility has made Indian stock markets more ”uncertain” than their counterparts in developed economies like the US and South Korea, and government should firm up regulatory mechanisms to usher in stability, the Economic Survey said on 27 February.
”In terms of volatility of weekly returns, uncertainties as reflected by the Indian indices were higher than that depicted by indices outside India such as S&P 500 of United States of America and Kospi of South Korea,” said the Economic Survey 2006-07 tabled in Parliament.
The Survey called for regulatory and other necessary steps to further facilitate enhanced institutional investment in equity markets, pointing out that this would counter- balance and cushion the impact of swings in stock prices.
The recent trend of investors’ growing preference for mutual funds will enhance institutional investment in the equity market, the Survey said.
Noting the BSE Sensex’s journey from the 13,000 to 14,000 mark in just 26 trading sessions, the Survey pointed out that Indian indices recorded ”higher volatility” on weekly returns during the two-year period from 2005 to 2006.
In comparision to 1.26% cent volatility on weekly returns in the US (S&P 500) and 2.73 in South Korea (Kospi), the volatility in India ranged from 2.96 (Sensex) and 3.23 (BSE 500) to 3.21 (Top 50 Nifty) and 4.07 (Nifty Junior), it said.
The market also saw increased daily volatility in 2006, as measured by the standard deviation of returns, partly due to a sharp sell-off during May in-line with global trends.
The price-to-earnings ratio, which partly reflects the investors’ expectations of future corporate earnings, was higher than 20% at the end of 2006, compared to 17-18 % a year ago, it said.
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First Published: Tue, Feb 27 2007. 03 16 PM IST
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