Fitness through a video game

Fitness through a video game
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First Published: Mon, Apr 30 2007. 10 27 AM IST
Updated: Mon, Apr 30 2007. 10 27 AM IST
West Virginia: Children don't often yell in excitement when they are let into class, but as the doors opened to the upper level of the gym at South Middle School, the assembled students let out a chorus of shrieks.
In they rushed, past the pingpong table, past the balance beams and the wrestling mats stacked unused. They sprinted past the ghosts of Gym Class Past toward two TV sets looming over square plastic mats on the floor. In less than a minute a dozen seventh-graders were dancing in furious kinetic union to the thumps of a techno song called "Speed Over Beethoven."
Bill Hines, a physical education teacher at the school for 27 years, shook his head a little, smiled and said, "I'll tell you one thing: They don't run in here like that for basketball."
It is a scene being repeated across the country as schools deploy the blood-pumping video game "Dance Dance Revolution" as the latest weapon in the nation's battle against the epidemic of childhood obesity. While traditional video games are often criticized for contributing to the expanding waistlines of the nation's children, at least several hundred schools in at least 10 states are now using "Dance Dance Revolution," or "DDR," as a regular part of their physical education curriculum.
Based on current plans, more than 1,500 schools are expected to be using the game by the end of the decade. Born nine years ago in the arcades of Japan, "DDR" has become a small craze among a generation of young Americans who appear less enamored of traditional team sports than their parents were and more amenable to the personal pursuits enabled by modern technology.
Incorporating "DDR" into gym class is part of a general shift in physical education, with school districts de-emphasizing traditional sports in favour of less competitive activities.
"Traditionally, physical education was about team sports and was very skills oriented," said Chad Fenwick, who oversees physical education for the Los Angeles Unified School District, where about 40 schools now use "Dance Dance Revolution." "What you're seeing is a move toward activities where you don't need to be so great at catching and throwing and things like that, so we can appeal to a wider range of kids."
A basic "DDR" system, including a television and game console, can be had for less than $500, but most schools that use the game choose to spend from $70 to $800 each for more robust mats, rather than rip apart the relatively flimsy versions meant for home use.
A physical instructor who has been finding it increasingly difficult to get children to run, sprint and do warm ups was pleansantly surprised when she was in a mall and walking by the arcade she saw kids playing 'DDR and was stunned. She said, "There were all these kids dancing and sweating and actually standing in line and paying money to be physically active and they were drinking water, not soda. It was a physical educator's dream."
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First Published: Mon, Apr 30 2007. 10 27 AM IST
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