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Look back, look ahead

Look back, look ahead
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First Published: Fri, Jul 16 2010. 09 36 PM IST

Lyrical: Menon’s Mother and Child (left) and Clone I
Lyrical: Menon’s Mother and Child (left) and Clone I
Updated: Fri, Jul 16 2010. 09 36 PM IST
Through the Patina
Anjolie Ela Menon
Lyrical: Menon’s Mother and Child (left) and Clone I
An illustrated book on Anjolie Ela Menon and her work, titled Anjolie Ela Menon: Through the Patina, with text by Isana Murthy, will be released on the occasion of her 70th birthday. Complementing the book will be a show featuring retrospective as well as recent works by the artist, with a focus on significant phases in a prolific career that spans six decades. Murthy says he is fascinated by how Menon addressed female nudes over the years and his book is divided into sections such as nudes, portraits, landscapes, and even chairs. Apparent throughout is Menon’s push to boldly innovate—besides oils and paints, she has made glass sculptures and kitsch works with abandoned furniture, and tried her hand at computer-aided art when the medium was still new in the mid-1990s. “Her female nudes are both haunting and sensual at the same time,” says Murthy. “The figures are sensual, yet able to convey pain and vulnerability.” Over the years, he adds, her works have become more complex even as themes and subjects are recurring.
At Vadehra Art Gallery, on view till 14 August.
Urban Testimonies
Deepjyoti Kalita, Kartik Sood, Nityananda Ojha and Siddhartha Kararwal
Works that reflect new-media practices by four artists who recently received their master’s degrees in art from MS University, Baroda, make up the first show of the new season for Latitude 28. These include junk jewellery, light boxes, programmed LED light, sensors, burnt blanket and video projection. There is nothing specifically city-oriented about the works, clarifies Bhavna Kakar, gallery proprietor, curator of the show and an MS University arts graduate herself. “The medium employed are part of our urban living,” she says. “They reflect the shift we see now in (the materials used in making) the works.” She stresses that there is nothing faddish or merely “trendy” about the works, which include The Incompetence of Being Complete, a sculptural installation by Deepjyoti Kalita fashioned out of paper, acrylic, fibreglass and LED.
At Latitude 28, on view till 18 August.
Going, Going, Gone Group show
New media and some gadgetry also feature in another group show, mostly of artists in their mid-30s. “There is no concept, no theme,” says Gallery Espace’s Renu Modi about the show, for which she has donned the curator’s hat. “I chose the artists because I liked their works.” Abstract paintings, “photo-realist” prints, installations, paperwork and photographs—they are all there, and the only uniting theme is Modi’s desire to bring them to the viewing public. But the works sit well together, imbuing the gallery space with a sense of quietude. She describes the works as fresh, which many of them are. Ajay Kanwal’s interactive work fashioned out of canvas, ghungroos (dancing bells) and infrared sensors, titled One Step=8,000 replies, as well as rocks that are floating in water, are diverting but also make you linger, as do most of the other works on display.
At Gallery Espace, on view till 6 August.
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First Published: Fri, Jul 16 2010. 09 36 PM IST