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Design on the menu

Design on the menu
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First Published: Fri, Sep 09 2011. 09 26 PM IST

Photograph by Divya Babu/Mint
Photograph by Divya Babu/Mint
Updated: Fri, Sep 09 2011. 09 26 PM IST
• Lampshades
Flipside, Hauz Khas Village, New Delhi
The six-month-old Café FlipSide has become popular for its casual, “let’s hang out” vibe. Owner Raavi Choudhary says: “We didn’t have the budget for a big, commercial interior design project. FlipSide is an extension of my living room. It’s personal and an ever-changing environment.”
Photograph by Divya Babu/Mint
A Japanese umbrella hanging upside down doubles up as a chandelier over a secluded couch, making for FlipSide’s best seat. Radiating a warm yellow light, this is a 60-year-old, delicate, original Japanese umbrella gifted to Choudhary by his uncle’s friend, who lives in Japan.
What you need: If you don’t have such an heirloom, don’t worry. You can use any decorative umbrella made of handmade paper or Jaipuri cloth. Get an electrician to fix the wiring. These umbrella lights work well in corners or as the centrepiece in a room, forming a halo on the ceiling as well as giving a diffused light.
• Light
The Pot Belly, Shahpur jat, New Delhi
Photograph by Divya Babu/Mint
In this café that serves Bihari food, owners Puja Sahu and Vivita Relan wanted everything to be in commune with nature. The café overlooks tree tops, and the partners wanted to continue the green theme indoors. “That’s how the idea of lamps that resemble flowers came up,” says Sahu. Colourful woven-cane lampshades, some in the shape of flowers and others just inverted baskets, hang from the ceiling at The Pot Belly. And that’s not all: Sahu and Relan have used cutting-chai glasses and glass jars as bulb holders. “We chased cane-furniture makers and got them to design these for us especially and then just got an electrician to fix up the wiring,” says Sahu. Each lamp costs Rs 700 approximately.
What you need: Cutting-chai glasses or any other glassware you’d like to use. Also, source cane baskets or especially woven cane lampshades. Make sure the baskets you choose are not too tightly woven.
• Dining Tables
Grey Garden, Hauz Khas Village, New Delhi
Photograph by Divya Babu/Mint
While you wait for your meal to arrive at Grey Garden, there is something else to keep you occupied. Teakwood tables with glass tops and a compartment underneath act as show windows. Vintage watches, old perfume bottles, kitschy matchboxes, dried leaves and other such charms are sandwiched between the glass-top tables. Designed by Himanshu Shani, who runs Cell DSGN, a design consultancy studio, and designer Mia Morikawa, the idea was to give each table a character.
“My partner at work, Shalabh Singh, collects matchboxes, so we made one with those. Mia used some net lace accessories that were left over from her garments, so we put that in. She also likes to collect sands from different parts of the world, so we used those in cork bottles,” says Shani.
What you need: While these tables at Grey Garden are for sale—the table costs Rs 15,000 and if you want one filled with accessories, it will be priced at Rs 45,000, while those with vintage pieces go up to a lakh—you can create your own table. Those nostalgia-ridden trinkets kept away in boxes can be put on your tables in the dining or living area at home. They’re sure to be conversation-starters. Get in touch with Grey Garden at info@thegreygarden.com
•Bead curtains
Estia, Aloft Hotel, Whitefield, Bangalore
Photograph : Courtesy Estia
The brief given to architect and designer M.C. Tilak Raj for the Mediterranean restaurant Estia was that it should reflect the cuisine being served. The furniture is made of dark brown wood to create a rustic look and provides a contrast to the bright sea blues and whites of the upholstery.
The striking bead curtains adorning the French windows that separate the bay area (next to the pool) from the restaurant draw attention. Designed by Sreeti Mondol, who works with brightly coloured glass beads, the curtains stand out for their colours and texture.
“The curtains create a seamless partition of sorts,” says Mondol, adding that the beads, made of glass, have been sourced from across South-East Asia and more prominently, India.
What you need: Bead curtains can be used easily at home. “Most clients requested for my curtains as separators between the kitchen and living room,” says Mondol, adding that these can also be used at the entrance to a terrace or balcony, or simply as a separator of rooms. Door-sized curtains (3x7ft) cost Rs 12,000-15,000. Get in touch with Mondol at 9845508083.
Pavitra Jayaraman contributed to this story.
komal.sharma@livemint.com
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First Published: Fri, Sep 09 2011. 09 26 PM IST