Review: Lloyd LAP20TC air purifier could have done with more cleaning power

This rather competent indoor air purifier doesn’t disappoint in terms of overall performance, but when compared to Xiaomi’s latest rival product, the differences can’t be ignored


LAP20TC has a 25-watt cleaning capacity, meant for room sizes around 17 square metres, delivering a claimed 175 m³/h of clean air delivery rate.
LAP20TC has a 25-watt cleaning capacity, meant for room sizes around 17 square metres, delivering a claimed 175 m³/h of clean air delivery rate.

There is no doubt that the outdoor air is extremely polluted, and will only get worse after the Diwali festival as we head into the winter season—cooler air closer to the ground level traps smoke and other particulates, worsening air quality. But if you thought this is just an outdoor problem, think again. Inside your house, things can be much worse. The polluted air is streaming in anyway, and to add to that, there are pollutants such as cooking gases, paint fumes and pet dander, which makes for a rather deadly cocktail of air inside your home—indoor air pollution has been linked to serious illnesses such as cancer, heart disease and dementia, among others. With indoor air purifiers, you can filter out pollutants like particulate matter, aldehydes, chlorinated hydrocarbons, ethers, esters, ketones, halogens and sulphur dioxide.

Lloyd, a consumer electronics brand, has rolled out the LAP20TC air purifier in India, and is priced at Rs.16,500. This has a 25-watt cleaning capacity, meant for room sizes around 17 square metres, delivering a claimed 175 m³/h of clean air delivery rate (CADR). This sort of power would be ideal for bedrooms and study rooms. The fan is extremely silent at low and medium speeds, and even at the highest fan speed, it is still not very loud. The control panel is at the top, with touch sensitive keys for power, fan speed, timer and ionizer.

The Lloyd LAP20TC takes in air through the vent at the back, runs them through multiple layers of filters and the clean air is blown out from the vent at the top. We prefer air vents at the top, because they help with air circulation better than a lot of purifiers with vents on the sides—the latter tend to get impeded by walls, furniture and other obstacles.

Read more: Review: Xiaomi Mi Air Purifier 2

During our air quality monitoring tests in a 19 sq. m room, the air quality improved from an unhealthy 97g/m3 to 31g/m3, in exactly 30 minutes, and the Lloyd LAP20TC then managed to bring it down to 19g/m3, where the numbers then stabilized. While this sort of performance is acceptable for most room sizes, we feel that the Lloyd LAP20TC will be a bit underpowered for rooms any larger than this, which basically means it’ll struggle to maintain the air quality in perhaps a larger living room or dining room. In comparison, the Philips AC4025/10 (Rs.16,995), which delivers a CADR of 147m³/h returns similar cleaning stats in the same room sizes.

However, the indoor air purification game has been turned on its head by the arrival of the Xiaomi Mi Purifier 2 (Rs.9,999). In our tests, in a 32.5 sq. meter living room, the 310m3/h CADR purifier improved the air quality from an unhealthy 123g/m3 of particulate matter (PM), to a much healthier 21 g/m3 PM. In a smaller 19 sq. meter room, the air quality improved within 30 minutes, from 91g/m3 to 11g/m3. And those sort of stats pale the Lloyd purifier and even the Philips’ performance to a large extent.

While the Lloyd LAP20TC is doing exactly what one would expect from an indoor air filtration device that costs as much, the fact that Xiaomi has a rival purifier that costs significantly lesser while delivering better cleaning stats, has changed the ecosystem completely.

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