The TimeOut mint Planner

The TimeOut mint Planner
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First Published: Fri, Jul 06 2007. 12 08 AM IST
Updated: Fri, Jul 06 2007. 12 08 AM IST
DELHI
Out & About
The Great Bake Off II
3 July
A fund-raising event for CanSupport, an NGO working in the field of cancer palliative care. The first Great Bake Off held last year was a huge success, generating a tidy sum for the organization. This year, the baking classes will be conducted by Hanife, who is an advanced nurse in oncology and an excellent baker. She has travelled all the way from the US to conduct a baking workshop for the cause. Half the proceeds from the classes will go to CanSupport. The workshop will include baking scones, savoury muffins, sweet whole oats bread and dinner rolls. 9.30am. Market Café, 8, Khan Market (4175-7703). Entry: Rs1,500 per person, per class.
Dance
Bharatanatyam
6 July
Saroja Vaidyanathan and students of Ganesa Natyalaya will present a ballet based on the Yajur Veda, highlighting the five elements of the human body and the manifestation of Shiva. The 75-minute ballet will be performed by eight dancers. 6.30pm. India International Centre, 40, Max Mueller Marg, Lodhi Estate (2461-9431). Free.
Ballet
8 July
The Geetanjali Society of Performing Arts presents Anandmath, a dance ballet, by its students who range from 17-year-olds to adults. The event is being held to announce the results of a dance and vocal competition by the society in the sub-junior, junior and senior categories. 4pm. Shriram Centre for Performing Arts, 4, Safdar Hashmi Marg (2371-4307). Free, invitation cards can be collected from Geetanjali Society of Performing Arts, B-119, Kalkaji, basement (4057-1202).
Art
Lost in a Lost World
8 July onwards
If 24-year-old artist Dhanur Goyal’s pen and ink paintings have a graphic feel to them, it’s because he started drawing with cartoons and caricatures, and still conducts a cartooning workshop at the Shri Ram School. This is Goyal’s second solo show and, in the two years since his last show, his drawn works have evolved considerably. 10am-8pm. Visual Arts Gallery, India Habitat Centre, Lodhi Road (2468-2222). Free.
Group Show
11 July onwards
Four artists from the MS University of Baroda and New Delhi display an assortment of works in a show organized by Gallerie Alternatives. Punkaj Kumar Manav is a sculptor and muralist who trained in New Delhi. This young artist worked in the design and execution of the New Delhi Metro murals. Rajesh Rana, a painter and graphic artist, has participated in a number of intriguing endeavours, including the creation of portraits of 72 Indian celebrities for the NDMC as a freelance artist. Rahul Mukherjee seems to question hero-worship in his works, as in a painting that alludes to cricket, Buddhism and the Mahabharata all at once. The fourth artist, Bhupen Barman, is a sculptor—originally from Assam, but trained in Vadodara. Greatly affected by the Gujarat riots, Barman creates abstract sculptures out of a variety of material, using the riots as a dominant theme. 11am-7pm (Mon-Sat). Triveni Kala Sangam, 205, Tansen Marg, Mandi House (2371-8833). Metro: Mandi House. Free.
Music
Artistes Unlimited
13 July
Back in the Capital after a tour of Mumbai and Bangalore in support of the Naz Foundation, AU has consistently set higher standards both for original as well as socially responsible music. Under the direction of the very talented Annette Philip, the 40-member AU will appear on stage with their full band. Expect a lively set. 7.30pm. Siri Fort Auditorium, Khel Gaon Marg (2649-3370). Tickets: Rs300, Rs250, Rs150, available at Tekson’s in GK I and South Extension.
Theatre
Maut Ke Saaye Mein
8 July
Manish Tomer’s play is a Hindi translation of Men without Shadows, an existential thriller that is considered one of the most provocative plays written by Jean Paul Sartre. 7pm (1 hour, 30 minutes). India Habitat Centre, Lodhi Road (2468-2222). Tickets: Rs100, available at the venue.
MUMBAI
Theatre
Kachche Lamhe
6 July
Quietly controlled and bereft of the flamboyant poetry of his earlier play Tumhari Amrita, Javed Siddiqi’s adaptation of Gulzar’s short story, Seema, directed by Salim Arif, is a tale of clashing desires. The marriage between Sudhir, a playwright, and Seema, an actor, is severely strained by Sudhir’s consuming passion for theatre. Seema leaves Sudhir to marry his chipper friend T.K., but she is unable to sever ties with her past. 9pm (2 hours). Prithvi Theatre, Janki Kutir, Juhu Church Road, Juhu, Vile Parle (2614-9546). Tickets: Rs100-150.
Katha Collage II
8 July
Rakesh Chaturvedi, Arvind Pandey, Heeba Shah, Vishwajeet Pradhan and Ankur Vikal, all National School of Drama alumni, refresh a Hindi stage that is stale with mawkish melodramas. After the somewhat weighty Katha Collage I, Naseeruddin Shah directs seven short stories by satirist Harishankar Parsai. Hypocrisy, government corruption and sarcasm are leitmotifs in Parsai’s stories. Katha opens with Telephone, in which a priest waxes eloquent on telephone etiquette and ways to evade phone calls as black-clad disciples sit around him sonorously chanting “phone” at regular intervals. 6pm, 9pm (2 hours). Prithvi Theatre, Janki Kutir, Juhu Church Road, Juhu, Vile Parle (2614-9546). Tickets: Rs100-150.
Film
Cinemascope
6 July
Theatre group Awishkar, documentary collective Vikalp and short film presenter The Short Circuit host short films and documentaries. In Sachin Kundalkar’s Shubhra Kaahi, a painter postpones his first exhibition and instead reflects on his world (duration: 17 minutes).
(Two musicians swap tales in Sandeep Mehta’s One Other One (duration: 10 minutes).
Subhash Kapoor uncovers another side to the Ram Lila festival in New Delhi in his Ram Lila (duration: 28 minutes).
Nishtha Jain’s City of Photos, a documentary on photo studios, is a tour of wistful memories and bizarre backdrops. Families say cheese against a backdrop of planes flying 9/11-style into New York’s World Trade Centre. A painter of backdrops applies his brush to canvas to replicate a particularly horrific train accident in Bihar a few years ago. Why would anyone want a photo with a smashed-up train poking from behind? Because, the painter explains, the backdrop allows people to pretend that they were there just after the accident happened (duration: 1 hour). 7.30pm. New Mahim Municipal School, Miya Mohammed Chotani Marg, Teesri Galli, Mahim (W) (2244-45871). Entry: Rs50. Students will be charged Rs25 and have to show their college identification cards.
Abouna
11 July
A part of Alliance Française’s package of African films. Beginning with the unannounced departure of an errant father, Mahamat-Saleh Haroun’s second feature follows the efforts of his two sons, left with their mother in the Chad capital, N’Djamena, to make sense of their lives in his absence. They’re dismayed, for instance, to learn that he hadn’t visited his supposed place of work in two years, and even more surprised when they’re convinced they’ve spotted him on screen during a trip to the cinema. There’s wry comedy here, but a strong sense, too, of rootlessness as the family buckles under the strain. The natural performances, vibrant palette of colours and perfectly attuned, gently melancholic music from Malian guitar hero Ali Farka Touré combine effortlessly. 6.30pm ( duration: 1 hour, 24 minutes). Alliance Française, Theosophy Hall, 40, New Marine Lines (2203-5993). Free.
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
11 July onwards
The latest chapter in the Harry Potter movie franchise opens a few weeks before the release of what is said to be the final Potter book. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix opens across the world and in India on 11 July, ahead of the release in bookshops of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. The Order of the Phoenix sees the magically endowed hero in his fifth year at Hogwarts School. On the curriculum this year is intra-school politics and more duels with Lord Voldemort. Even if the book series ends, there are two more movies to look forward to. British television director David Yates takes charge of this movie and the next, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, which will be released next year. Major cinemas.
Out & About
Makeshift Mumbai
9 July
The Kamala Raheja Vidyanidhi Institute of Architecture (KRVIA) is organizing a five-day exhibition of various city projects on which it has worked. KRVIA’s curriculum focuses strongly on Mumbai and its unique problems. The innovative objects designed by the students include jackets with vacuum pumps in the back to firmly attach a person to the walls of a local train, leaving his hands free. The more complex subjects, such as urban studies and urban design, push the students to study the systems that affect the city, such as its garbage disposal system, the rent control legislations and cess structures. 10.30am-5.30pm. Coomaraswamy Hall, Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya, MG Road, opposite Regal Theatre. For more information, call KRVIA (2284-4519/2284-4484). Entry: Rs15 for adults, Rs10 for children.
RECOMMENDED
Music
DELHI
The Harvard Krokodiloes
16 July
Taking their name from the ancient Greek word for crocodile, the Harvard Krokodiloes are a cappella group founded at the university’s Hasty Pudding Club in 1946. The kroks have grown over the years to a 12-member- strong tuxedo-clad group (including two, today, of Indian origin) singing all-American classics—jazz, swing, rock and ballads included—from the 1920s to the 1960s. The kroks come to the Capital as part of their annual world tour. 7.30pm. India Habitat Centre, Lodhi Road (2468-2222). Free.
Art
MUMBAI
Relics of Grey
6 July onwards
In Archana Hande’s new exhibition, Relics of Grey, the artist explores how ideas of identity and heritage are changing. Inspired by the way the country’s history is being dealt with by the jingoism of right-wing factions, Hande decided to explore how colonial legacy has been transmuted in Mumbai, Kolkata, Bangalore and Chennai.
The exhibition at Gallery Chemould is divided into three parts, described as Black Town, Grey Town and White Town. Black Town shows contemporary Mumbai as a symbol of modern India, a space where the present is a fusion of the past and future. Grey Town explores the world of those who weren’t white and yet were on the fringes of Indian society, such as the anglicized Bengali aristocracy of Kolkata, which exists in a time warp. White Town is Victoria House, which is the façade of the erstwhile Victoria Terminus. 11am-7pm (Mon-Sat). Chemould Prescott Road, Queen’s Mansion, Third Floor, AK.Naik Marg, Fort (2200-0212).
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First Published: Fri, Jul 06 2007. 12 08 AM IST