Tom Hanks, Irrfan Khan-starrer ‘Inferno’ releases in India two weeks ahead of US showing

Bollywood offerings include ‘Saat Uchakkey’ and ‘Beiimaan Love’


Tom Hanks and  Irrfan Khan in a still from ‘Inferno’
Tom Hanks and Irrfan Khan in a still from ‘Inferno’

New Delhi: It’s not the most exciting week at the movies.

Director Sanjeev Sharma’s comedy Saat Uchakkey starring Manoj Bajpayee, Anupam Kher, Kay Kay Menon and Annu Kapoor seeks to blend wicked wit, wild flights of fancy and gritty realism but the outcome is well shy of productive, says NDTV Movies. The director, also the film’s co-writer, does come up with a few bright ideas and some flashes of inspired lunacy along the way but is unable to make them count. While the ensemble cast appears to be enjoying itself, the script offers them little help as they seek to inject hilarity into the proceedings. In the end, the film is a colossal waste. Read more

Sunny Leone and Rajniesh Duggall-starrer Beiimaan Love directed by Rajeev Chaudhari lacks the much-needed punch, says India.com. The film is an attempt to project Leone as an actor, one that should have been averted. Read more

For the Hollywood fans, director Ron Howard’s adaptation of the Dan Brown novel, Inferno, starring Tom Hanks, Felicity Jones and Irrfan Khan comes to India two weeks ahead of its US release. The film holds true to the letter and spirit of its source, though that’s not necessarily a compliment, says Variety magazine. If you found the first two films, The Da Vinci Code and Angels & Demons soulless and joyless, things have gotten a little bit worse this time. The film more or less goes through the popcorn motions, but with less technical finesse (and even less mischievous irony) than one might expect from the Howard imprint. Read more

Empire magazine agrees that the Brown adaptation again sees the filmmakers elevating weak material after the first two movies. Aside from stray traces of Hanks’ charm sneaking through Langdon’s dourness, it all threatens to become dull. Read more

Mystery thriller The Girl on the Train directed by Tate Taylor starring Emily Blunt, Rebecca Ferguson and Haley Bennett has plenty to keep it rolling, says The Guardian. From Charlotte Bruus Christensen’s adventurous cinematography to Danny Elfman’s expressive score and Erin Cressida Wilson’s oddly sympathetic script. Most importantly, in the shape of the mercurial Emily Blunt, the film has a believably derailed heroine who retains an air of mystery and intrigue. Read more

Empire magazine is less impressed, mentioning that the mystery here fails to intrigue. It’s the thriller aspect that most lets the film down, failing to truly engage or offer enough plausible red herrings to send your mind whirring through different theories as to what could have happened. The twists rarely, if ever, have the impact that were intended. Read more

Action thriller The Accountant directed by Gavin O’Connor starring Ben Affleck, Anna Kendrick and J.K. Simmons is a drama so familiar and formulaic that even the most timid viewer will be comforted. Or, more likely, anaesthetized, says The Guardian. The film has that deadly action movie vice, pretensions to cleverness and emotional weight. Tragic back stories are parceled out to all and the conclusion of the film devolves into a series of over-determined twist revelations. Read more

Crime comedy Masterminds directed by Jared Hess starring Zach Galifianakis, Owen Wilson, Kristen Wiig and Jason Sudeikis leans heavily on its cast of comic ringers without giving them anything especially funny to say or do, says A.V Club. The real waste, though, is of a true story that didn’t require the Jared Hess treatment. Read more

Several releases this week haven’t elicited any reviews yet. These include Hindi movies Anna: Kisan Baburao Hazare, Six X and Love Day—Pyaar Ka Din, Tamil thriller Shivanagam, Marathi comedy Ghanta, Punjabi films Kharkuwaad, Lock and Aatishbaazi Ishq and Gujarati movie Khaatti Meethi Setting.

More From Livemint