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First Published: Tue, Aug 12 2008. 12 35 AM IST

Updated: Tue, Aug 12 2008. 10 49 AM IST
SURF
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Not waking up refreshed? Everyday items and lifestyle choices could be to blame. Or it could be in your genes! For more on sleep disorders,
WEAR
They’re soft, squishy and come in every shade, from cotton candy to mango to army green. Best of all, say doctors and nurses who love their Crocs, they’re comfortable. But they’re dotted with holes. That’s why several hospitals in the US have banned employees from wearing traditional Crocs. JoAnn Shea, director of employee health services, Tampa General Hospital, explains, “Blood could go through the hole, and say you have a cut on your foot, then you’re exposed” to various diseases. But all is not lost. Crocs Inc. is making a new shoe, the Specialist, with no holes on top! Hues include fuchsia, chocolate, sea blue—and white, especially for nurses. Lisa Greene ©2008/The New York Times
PLAY
Mark Twain once said golf was a good walk spoiled. But now it turns out that a spoiled walk may help you live longer. A recent Swedish study concluded that golfers live an average of five years more than non-golfers. Sweden’s highly respected Karolinska Institutet found in its study that the death rate for golfers was 40% lower than for other people of the same sex, age and socio-economic status. The study, published in the ‘Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports’, is based on data from 300,000 Swedish golfers. “A round of golf means being outside for 4 or 5 hours, walking at a fast pace for 6-7km, something which is known to be good for health,” study co-author Anders Ahlbom said. “People play golf into old age, and there are also positive social and psychological aspects to the game that can be of help.” Tony Castro ©2008/The New York Times
KNOW
The Third National Sleep Medicine Course, a two-day session on sleep medicine for Indian physicians, will be held in Bhubaneswar, Orissa, from 20-22 December. It is being organized by the National Institute for Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bangalore, and the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, with supporting faculty from the US. For more information, contact:
Bindu M. Kutty, additional professor and organizing secretary, department of neurophysiology, Nimhans, Bangalore-560029; email: bindu@nimhans.kar.nic.in, bindu.nimhans@gmail.com. Seema Singh
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First Published: Tue, Aug 12 2008. 12 35 AM IST
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