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The object of my addiction

The object of my addiction
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First Published: Sat, Apr 07 2007. 12 54 AM IST

Updated: Sat, Apr 07 2007. 12 54 AM IST
Has been firmly locked up at home today.
It was certainly not love at first sight. For a full month, it just lay there, waiting for me to acknowledge its existence. When I finally did allow it coveted access to my handbag, it remained sweetly somnolent.
But workplaces will be workplaces and, one day, I was forced to switch it on. A couple of thumb whirls and a few gazes at a hypnotic blinking light later, I was hooked.
Of course I’m not the first to fall. The addiction has been well-documented. I just read that Prince Harry’s date with his close friend Natalie Pinkham landed him in trouble with his similarly-addicted girlfriend Chelsy Davy, who was away in the Caribbean, but found out about his drinking buddy through the device in question.
If we were still in the Mohammed Rafi era, I could have hummed Mera dil machal gaya to mera kya kasoor hai, and moved on. But we live in technologically-charged times.
By last weekend, I was reading The New York Times on my BlackBerry, opening the Fashion Week jpegs that flooded my inbox and seeing if I could download Flash 7.0 so that my nieces could access everythinggirl.com. I was replying to every email 30 seconds before I got it, waking up and training one sleepy eye on that mesmerizing light even before my morning cuppa.
Jack Welch would probably have attributed it to my passion for my work but the husband had started calling me CrackBerry. Finally, my editor announced in his usual understated manner: I think I should take back your BlackBerry.
For those of you who are technologically trapped, here are two tips from a 12-step deaddiction programme, recommended by The Wall Street Journal.
Don’t check email for the first hour of the day. In addition to giving you time to read the newspaper or spend time with your family, this will help you shake the tic-like checking ritual.
Upon arriving home, practise a ritual that helps you mentally separate the work day from the after-work evening. Light a candle, put on music, pour a cocktail. Don’t check your email during this time.
And here are two tips from me: Go back to your first love, SMS, and spend the whole weekend switched off, reading Lounge and doing the things we recommend. Like visiting the sculpture exhibition in your neighbourhood (Page 12), ordering off the menu (Page 11) or stocking your wardrobe with colour (Page 8).
Keep the Luxury Quiz responses coming—we close entries today. Those Jimmy Choos have your name written all over them.
Write to lounge@livemint.com
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First Published: Sat, Apr 07 2007. 12 54 AM IST
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