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Film Review | Shakal pe mat ja

Film Review | Shakal pe mat ja
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First Published: Fri, Nov 18 2011. 07 33 PM IST

Asinine: The acting is poor and the background music, jarring
Asinine: The acting is poor and the background music, jarring
Updated: Fri, Nov 18 2011. 07 33 PM IST
A catalogue of PJs
The film opens with a slate that reads: Smoking is injurious to health and terrorism is injurious to wealth. This is the only social comment the film makes.
Writer-director Shubh Mukherjee also stars as Ankit, leader of the pack of four boys mistaken to be terrorists and detained by the Central Industrial Security Force (CISF). Another of the group is Ankit’s younger brother; a third is a man with a fake American accent and chronic flatulence. The last is a long-haired, yoga-preaching college boy. Their combined IQ would barely cross into double digits. Every other word they utter is “Dude”.
Asinine: The acting is poor and the background music, jarring
The foursome’s offence is trespassing into Airports Authority land and filming an American Airlines aircraft flying overhead. Their alibi is that they were taking the shot for a documentary film they were making.
The CISF is suspicious, especially after watching the footage on their video recorder. The Anti-Terrorism Squad officer (Saurabh Shukla) is also suspicious. A series of circumstantial discoveries lands the boys deeper in trouble. At the same time, intelligence agencies receive reports that a group of terrorists is planning an attack somewhere in Delhi.
Incompetent investigators and asinine youth ensure that this farce continues for a painful 2 hours, 20 minutes. Even the jarring background music and irritating sound design can’t drown out the horrendous dialogues. As the CISF officer, Raghuvir Yadav is the only one attempting to act; the rest are simply hamming or adding to your impatience. ‘Shakal Pe Mat Ja’ is a catalogue of puerile PJs that you expect to hear in a college canteen with boys high-fiving each other after the punch line.
Sample this: Man 1: “Bring me the Sikh family.”
Man 2: “Who is sick?”
Man 1: “Not sick, Sikh! Now I am going to be sick.”
So am I.
‘Shakal Pe Mat Ja’ released in theatres on Friday.
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First Published: Fri, Nov 18 2011. 07 33 PM IST