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Fibroids linked to weight gain

Fibroids linked to weight gain
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First Published: Tue, Feb 19 2008. 12 50 AM IST

Updated: Tue, Feb 19 2008. 12 50 AM IST
More than 25% of Indian women are affected with fibroids—the single most important cause of infertility—and new research shows that the figure could be higher, depending on the diet, excess weight and blood pressure. During the course of the study, carried out on 2,142 patients affected with infertility due to fibroids, it was found that the chances of contracting fibroids increase if a first-degree female relative has them.
There was a strong relation between infertility in patients with fibroids more than 5cm in size and more than three years of no conception, said Prakash Trivedi, a leading gynaecologist who was part of the study. Dr Trivedi’s new technique for the removal of fibroids is based on a new understanding of blood supply to the fibroid, which is parasitic, and dissection plus endosuturing techniques.
Laparoscopic removal of fibroids increased the pregnancy rate to 42% and decreased the abortion rate to 5%. But there was found to be a need for an elective Caesarean section in such patients. The research also threw light on the fact that for every 10kg of excess weight gain, there is an 18% increase in the chance of fibroids. High abortions, preterm delivery, increased chances of Caesarean section are some of the after-effects of fibroids. Of the women affected, 45% suffered from infertility and abortions were high in 38%. (PTI)
The risks of metabolic syndrome
Children with a clustering of cardiovascular risk factors that define metabolic syndrome are likely to have the syndrome in mid-adulthood, or even heart diseases or diabetes, according to a new study. Metabolic syndrome is a grouping of risk factors that indicate a high risk of developing cardiovascular disease or diabetes. The risk factors include high triglyceride levels, high glucose levels, high blood pressure, low levels of “good” HDL cholesterol, and being overweight.
The current findings stem from a 30-year follow-up of 814 students, between five and 19 years, after they enrolled in a New York-based National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute study done between 1973 and 1976.
“In the follow-up study, participants who had metabolic syndrome as children were about 13 times more likely to have cardiovascular disease and 6.5 times more likely to have Type II diabetes than participants who did not have metabolic syndrome as children,” John A. Morrison of Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, noted in comments to ‘Reuters Health’.(Reuters)
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First Published: Tue, Feb 19 2008. 12 50 AM IST
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