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Film Review | Hum Tum Aur Ghost

Film Review | Hum Tum Aur Ghost
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First Published: Fri, Mar 26 2010. 08 04 PM IST

Miss spook: Dia Mirza and Arshad Warsi fail to impress.
Miss spook: Dia Mirza and Arshad Warsi fail to impress.
Updated: Fri, Mar 26 2010. 08 04 PM IST
Ghost town blues
Armaan (Arshad Warsi) drinks till he passes out. Though he is a photographer who drives a Porsche and spends his nights sleeping on a railway station bench, he’s neither homeless nor broke. On the contrary, thanks to his girlfriend Gehna (Dia Mirza), he is successfully employed, shooting fashion features for the glossy glamour magazine she edits. So why does Armaan sleep on a bench?
Miss spook: Dia Mirza and Arshad Warsi fail to impress.
We discover—at the speed of a bullock cart—that his flat is haunted. For some inexplicable reason, the ghosts float around only Armaan, and through one of them we learn that he sees dead people (M. Night Shyamalan should sue the film’s makers for the blatant borrowing of his famous punch line from The Sixth Sense in this confused film).
Gehna is unconvinced by Armaan’s confession of his special powers, preferring to accept the psychiatrist’s opinion that he is a schizophrenic suppressing some trauma from his childhood. Armaan, in the meantime, begins helping three unsettled souls—a young boy, Mr Kapoor (Boman Irani) and Carol, a mother in search of her son. Believing that he has lost his mind, Gehna gives up on Armaan even as he finds the missing piece in the jigsaw of his own childhood. The exaggerated climax is simply bizarre.
Hum Tum aur Ghost is derailed by a befuddled script: Part romance, part comic, verging on the supernatural, it is unable to engage at any level. The romance is mostly demonstrated by songs. Armaan and Gehna saying “I love you” to each other ever so often proves that the dialogue writers took the easy way out.
Sandhya Mridul’s hammy opening scene prepares you for a bumpy ride. In spite of accomplished credits such as Ashok Mehta (cinematographer) and Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy (music), the movie fails to hit the high notes. Director Kabeer Kaushik’s debut film Sehar (with Warsi in an underrated role) has a cult following, but the conviction of his earlier work is missing from this one. Give this one a pass and watch Sehar on DVD instead.
Hum Tum aur Ghost released in theatres on Friday.
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First Published: Fri, Mar 26 2010. 08 04 PM IST