Why more Sex now?

Why more Sex now?
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First Published: Sat, Jun 07 2008. 12 25 AM IST

I do: Will Carrie marry Big?
I do: Will Carrie marry Big?
Updated: Sat, Jun 07 2008. 12 25 AM IST
Things were tied up so neatly, weren’t they?
Big had decided Carrie was the one. Miranda had learnt to love a man and a borough. Charlotte had a baby on the way. Samantha had found herself an equal partner.
Plenty was said about 2004’s Sex and the City series finale — both positive and negative — but no one could argue that the ending didn’t give us extreme closure.
I do: Will Carrie marry Big?
So, why return? Why take a risk and make a movie?
The answer is partly simple: Because you missed them — and you weren’t shy about it.
You watched repeats and bought the DVDs. You consumed self-help books based on episodes and bought fragrances and clothing designed by the show’s stars. Even years after Sex and the City died, you continued to blog about what would happen after the finale as if the characters were real.
In other words, blame yourselves.
“The fact that I knew I had an enormous amount of love in the world for these characters was sort of the thing that overpowered the fear of, ‘You’re going to fail’,” says Sex and the City writer-director Michael Patrick King. “The fact that the fans wanted to see the girls more than I was afraid to write them was a big deal.”
Yes, there is financial motivation for a Sex and the City film; fanatical fans who continue to re-watch the HBO series on demand and on DVDs will undoubtedly see the movie at least once.
But after a screening of the two-and-a-half-hour Sex and the City movie (yes, it’s that long) in New York City, Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall, and Sex mastermind King said in separate interviews that their main reason for making the Sex and the City movie was that the four archetypal characters have been deeply missed by fans, who haven’t found adequate replacements for their fictional friends, despite the onslaught of television knock-offs such as Cashmere Mafia (by Sex and the City producer Darren Star) and Lipstick Jungle (like Sex and the City, also based on a book by Candace Bushnell).
Cattrall says the rabid Sex fan base hasn’t diminished or moved on since the finale. They’ve just been wallowing in the past, quoting episodes, and blogging about reunions.
“It’s about family,” says Cattrall, who was wearing a light blue dress too tame for Samantha. “You say, ‘I miss these characters.’ Well that’s what you say about your family. You say, ‘I miss my family.’ That boundary is so easily crossed because you come into people’s living rooms.”
So, that’s an answer to the question of “Why?” — it’s supply for your demand. As for why it took so long, King says, in his cheekiest of voices, “Ladies take their time.”
And, as the previews suggest, the film answers the wedding question. “When the movie became an idea, I knew that the one story that had been left untold from talking to people over the years was the big story — literally the Big story,” King says, referring to Chris Noth’s character, who not only has a first name in the movie, but gets a last name, too. “Will they, would they, won’t they, and what would that be? I knew that I had the idea of a wedding in my mind, and I said, okay, this is Carrie Bradshaw, so the wedding has to be complicated, if it exists at all.”
Cagey, isn’t he? As you’ve seen in the trailers, nothing is clear, and King and Parker have been especially good at keeping the ending of this movie a secret. All Parker discloses about what you’ll see on the big screen is a film that says that “not every sentence has to end with a period”. How very Carrie of her.
The movie released in Mumbai on Friday.
The Boston Globe
©2008/The New York Times
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First Published: Sat, Jun 07 2008. 12 25 AM IST