Baaghi, The Man Who Knew Infinity part of a dull movie week

‘Baaghi’ is an all-brawns-and-no-brains feature, while ‘The Man Who Knew Infinity’ is a treacly maths drama that doesn’t quite add up


Tiger Shroff is stiff and rigid, while Shraddha Kapoor is more a prop in ‘Baaghi’.
Tiger Shroff is stiff and rigid, while Shraddha Kapoor is more a prop in ‘Baaghi’.

New Delhi: Baaghi, starring Tiger Shroff and Shraddha Kapoor and directed by Sabbir Khan, needs to be avoided if you’re looking for anything other than an all-brawns-and-no-brains feature, says Gulf News. Shroff may break bones with bare hands but he lacks the ability to sway viewers emotionally. Kapoor, meanwhile, is underutilized and the film is ridden with cliches. Read more here

The Reporter Times agrees that well-choreographed action sequences don’t make for an engaging film. Shroff is stiff and rigid, while Kapoor is more a prop. Read more here

Jimmy Shergill-starrer Shortcut Safaari, directed by Amitabha Singh is a dull, morose affair that can be skipped, says The Times Of India. It is touted to be an adventure tale but there is dearth of genuine thrills and the poor CGI doesn’t help. Read more here

For Hollywood fans, American science fiction psychological thriller 10 Cloverfield Lane, directed by Dan Trachtenberg and starring Mary Elizabeth Winstead, John Goodman and John Gallagher, Jr., comes to India this week. Variety magazine calls it a sensationally effective semi-sequel (to 2008 found-footage disaster movie Cloverfield) that bears virtually no narrative or stylistic resemblance to its predecessor. The tension is rooted in psychology rather than gimmickry, and evinces a command of craft that feels old-fashioned in the most refreshing possible sense. Read more here

The Guardian calls it a taut, Hitchcockian thriller. The script never resorts to stereotypes, turning the “victim” into a resourceful survivor and the “kidnapper” into a self-aware protector, and it delivers a seat-edge series of suspenseful sequences with tension always threatening to erupt into violence. In the lead role, Mary Elizabeth Winstead is dynamite, bringing elegant restraint by avoiding gender cliches and evoking believable terror. Read more here

Director Garry Marshall’s Mother’s Day, starring Jennifer Aniston, Kate Hudson and Julia Roberts, is an endless comedy that tries to be all-inclusive in its depiction of mothers, says The Boston Globe. There is an execrable script in place by a committee of five writers and ham-fisted direction by the 81-year-old Marshall. But some performances, like those by Aniston and Roberts, prevail. Read more here

The Times Herald is more impressed, calling it mostly pleasant and occasionally touching. Though Marshall starts to lose control as the movie nears the end. It grows both slapsticky and stupid and the goodwill that has been built up gradually dissipates. Aniston especially brings much emotional heft to the lightweight material. Read more here

British biographical drama The Man Who Knew Infinity, directed by Matthew Brown and starring Dev Patel and Jeremy Irons, is a treacly maths drama that doesn’t quite add up, says The Guardian. It’s a film with its heart in the right place, but the problem of how to represent mathematical problems on screen is not really solved. Read more here

Empire adds that despite being well-intentioned and played, the film only shows flashes of what could have been, but is ultimately let down by its timidity towards maths, and fails to make the case for its own hero’s greatness. If there’d been more on the thrill of Ramanujan’s mathematical deductions and a little less meandering through a perfunctorily sketched arranged marriage, this could have been top of its class. Read more here

In the south, Tamil courtroom drama Manithan, directed by I. Ahmed and starring Udhayanidhi Stalin, Hansika Motwani and Prakash Raj, a remake of Arshad Warsi-starrer Jolly LLB releases on Friday. The film may lag slightly in the first half but grips you completely post-intermission, especially in the last 15 minutes, says The Reporter Times. The performances are superlative too. Read more here

A few releases this week haven’t inspired any reviews yet. These include Pirates 1.0, directed by Raj Madiraju and starring Indraneil Sengupta; Telugu film Raja Cheyyi Veste, directed by debutante Pradeep and starring Nara Rohit and Isha Talwar; and Kannada film Chakravyuha directed by M. Saravanan and featuring Puneeth Rajkumar and Rachita Ram.

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