×
Home Companies Industry Politics Money Opinion LoungeMultimedia Science Education Sports TechnologyConsumerSpecialsMint on Sunday
×

Back to the basics

Back to the basics
Comment E-mail Print Share
First Published: Fri, Mar 12 2010. 08 56 PM IST
Updated: Fri, Mar 12 2010. 08 56 PM IST
Sabyasachi Mukherjee
I’m starting a new movement for ethnic woven saris. I am sitting down with weavers, giving them my specifications, telling them what colours and borders I want, and getting them to produce these saris. I will sell them at my stores at a 15% mark-up in beautiful old boxes. This is my way of trying to get the younger generation interested in handloom. I do see women converting back to traditional Indian saris after wearing synthetic ones.
Manish Malhotra
My saris this season have a lot of digital prints. However, the whole sari is not digitally printed because I like to mix lots of things together. There are also many summery, resort influences. Each time I like to imagine Indian clothes in a different way and I feel resort wear can be Indian. So there are dhoti pants worn under a sari and a one-shoulder top worn with a sari—basically, a lot of fun elements incorporated into the sari. The colours are sand, dust, grey, cream, beige, coral, ivory and pink. There’s hardly any embroidery, just a touch of thread work and shells, but it’s very little.
Rocky S
I want to drape the sari in a very different manner this season. So the drapes you see are not the usual. I’ve added dupattas to give a bit of a twist to the draping and make it more interesting. Basically, I wanted the saris to be very young. They are for women who are modern, but holding on to tradition. The blouses are sexy, off-shouldered and strappy. The colours are fresh summer colours. Embroidery is all in crystals, pearl and dull gold.
Ravi Bajaj
My saris are primarily cocktail saris for contemporary women. Their USP is their weightlessness and only chiffon and net have been used. The palette for spring is upbeat with lime, orange, old rose, nude and lavender. Incidentally, there are no black and white saris this season, which is an exception I have never made before. I believe in layering my designs, so you have net merging into chiffon by the use of several embellishing mediums, such as pearls or appliqué techniques, pleating and darting.
Gaurav Gupta
My saris will include more Indian colours such as mango and powder pink. I’m blending typically Indian colours with purples and royal blue, which is a more European colour sensibility. Expect net pallus on georgette saris. I have used embroidery, but in a way that is draped around the body. There will be a lot of play on the shoulders, with brooches, pleating and lace and net details. Some pallus are attached to the blouses, so the drape falls in a certain way.
Comment E-mail Print Share
First Published: Fri, Mar 12 2010. 08 56 PM IST