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Community kitchens

Community kitchens
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First Published: Sat, Sep 10 2011. 01 37 PM IST

Updated: Sat, Sep 10 2011. 01 37 PM IST
Indian food is not defined just by state boundaries. Within each state, there are significant differences in cooking styles and ingredients, depending on the community you belong to. In some cases, religion too plays an important role in how the food items are sourced, prepared and served. Yet other cuisines are a mishmash of different regional fare and now stand out as culinary delights. We identified a few communities—Sindhi, Bunt, Bene Israeli, Anglo-Indian, Bohri, Khasi, Coorgi, Kayastha—and asked authors, chefs, consultants and food aficionados to tell us what makes these cuisines unique, how they came about, and what the must-use ingredients are. Here’s what you should keep in mind if you plan a menu based on one of these cuisines.
Lasagna and dining tables are fast replacing traditional Bohri ‘thaals’, and the lavish meals that accompany them (read more)
Given to dining at emperors’ tables, these men (and women) of letters take pride in eating well (read more)
A cuisine that uses coconuts to sweeten a dish and Byadgi chillies to give it a bright-red colour, all at once (read more)
This no-spice cuisine relies on the quality of the meats to enhance the taste of its dishes (read more)
Sindhi food is distinct in flavour and ingredients from its more well-known north Indian counterparts (read more)
A leftover from the Raj days that still brings joy to all (read more)
Bene Israeli cuisine innovates with local ingredients under kosher laws (read more)
Dominantly non-vegetarian, with a taste for pork, Coorgi cuisine uses local produce and sometimes fruit to make it spicy and interesting (read more)
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First Published: Sat, Sep 10 2011. 01 37 PM IST