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For, of and by women

For, of and by women
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First Published: Tue, Mar 23 2010. 11 53 PM IST

Dastkar Ranthambore artisans stitching a quilt
Dastkar Ranthambore artisans stitching a quilt
Updated: Tue, Mar 23 2010. 11 53 PM IST
Craftswomen and women entrepreneurs from across the country will display and sell their creations at an exhibition at the American Center in New Delhi over two days—24 and 25 March. There will also be a workshop on how best women’s groups can strategize and learn to function like a business.
Dastkar Ranthambore artisans stitching a quilt
The All India Artisans and Craftworkers Welfare Association (AIACA) has joined hands with the Self Employed Women’s Association (Sewa), Craftmark Handmade in India and Fabindia to organize the exhibition. They have partnered with 14 craft enterprises, such as Sadhna, Speed Trust, Kala Raksha, Jan Sandesh, Self-Help Enterprises (SHE), Norbulingka Institute, Chakhesang Women Welfare Society, Sandur Kushala Kala Kendra, Women Weave, Kadam and Gond Artisans.
“We are trying to connect the various crafts groups with the mainstream market by helping them with design development, costing, pricing, etc. It’s a great way to highlight their work and introduce their talent to the people,” says Adarsh Kumar, AIACA executive director.
There will be a fashion show on 27 March at the Crafts Museum at Pragati Maaidan, which will highlight garments and accessories from different groups. There will be the Ma Dhuli collection of organic cotton, and a range by fashion designer Rahul Mishra.
The Chakhesang Women Welfare Society
The handicrafts on display will include garments, home furnishings, art and accessories. Women Weave will present organic-cotton and natural-dye fabric. SHE will showcase saris, salwar-kurtas, dupattas and bedspreads, among other things, with kantha embroidery. Mura Collective, which trains and employs youth with special needs, works with Shibori textiles and only uses natural dyes. Jan Sandesh collects waste material from local tailors and uses it to create quirky accessories. It also recycles material to make greeting cards. The Norbulingka artisans create products using traditional Tibetan techniques of appliqué, woodwork, sculpture and thangka painting.
“The buyers will get access to high-quality products and get to directly interact with the craftsmen,” says Kumar.
rachana.n@livemint.com
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First Published: Tue, Mar 23 2010. 11 53 PM IST