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First Published: Thu, Mar 26 2009. 09 56 PM IST

Reinterpreting myths: Rajgarhia uses patachitra to revisit myths.
Reinterpreting myths: Rajgarhia uses patachitra to revisit myths.
Updated: Thu, Mar 26 2009. 09 56 PM IST
DELHI
Art
And The Silence Drops Down
Until 3 April
Indrapramit Roy’s paintings show desolate and striking suburban landscapes. The overall impression one gets upon viewing the 22 works on display is not one of impending disaster, but of a catastrophe that’s already happened. The suburban landscapes that Roy paints are devoid of people. The buildings remain intact, the swimming pool is filled with sparkling clear water, the lights are on in empty homes and the stuffed toys on the cupboard are untouched. It’s as though everyone vanished without a trace.
Roy uses this emptiness to his advantage. The views of this desolate landscape are breathtaking, washed over in alternating light and dark colours and captured from a variety of cinematic angles.
11am-7pm. Anant Art Gallery, F-213B, Lado Sarai (41554775).
Bengal Patachitra
Until 31 March
Reinterpreting myths: Rajgarhia uses patachitra to revisit myths.
Curated by Smritee Rajgarhia, this series of beautifully detailed folk art paintings is inspired by the wandering storytellers of Bengal. The tradition of verbal interpretation of myths complimented by pictures, patachitras are manuscripts which describe mythical pasts, often reinterpreted in a contemporary style. The show is presented by Arts of the Earth.
11am-7pm, daily. Art Konsult, 23, Hauz Khas Village (26531819).
Dance
National Festival of New Choreographers
27-29 March
In its 11th year now, this festival has been offering a platform for young dancers across different classical forms and regions (Manipuri, Odissi, Kathak, Kuchipudi and Bharatanatyam) to showcase their talent under the guidance of leading choreographers. For further information and passes, contact Bijan Mukherjee of Impresario India (26897615, 9873892229).
7pm. Habitat World, India Habitat Centre, Lodhi Road (43663333).
Music
Nityanand Haldipur
28 March
A recital by one of the country’s leading flautists. Tutored in the Senia Maihar ‘gharana’, Haldipur is a disciple of the legendary Annapurna Devi, daughter of Ustad Allauddin Khan.
7pm. Habitat World, India Habitat Centre, Lodhi Road (43663333).
Gundecha Brothers
2 April
A ‘dhrupad’ vocal recital by its foremost exponents, Umakant and Ramakant Gundecha. The brothers are disciples of noted ‘dhrupad’ vocalist Zia Fariduddin Dagar and Rudra veena player Zia Mohiuddin Dagar. The concert is part of the Jeevan Pani Memorial Festival, which is in its ninth year. This annual festival is organized by the Centre for Indian Classical Dances (CICD) in memory of its founder-trustee Jeevan Pani—a poet, musicologist, scholar and educationist who died in 1998. The event aims to provide a platform for both veteran and young artists.
7pm. Habitat World, India Habitat Centre, Lodhi Road (43663333).
Film
Stavisky
2 April
Alain Resnais’ film about political destiny in France in the 1930s is always thoroughly chilling, never merely elegant. The chill stems not just from the cold precision of the images, but from the unshakeable implications of what he allows us to witness. 1 hour, 57 min.
5.30pm & 7.30pm. ML Bhartia auditorium, Alliance Française de Delhi, 72, Max Mueller Marg, Lodhi Estate (43500200).
Around town
50 Years in Exile: Tibet Experience
Until 30 March
The department of information and international relations, the bureau of His Holiness the Dalai Lama and the India International Centre commemorate 50 years of exile of the Dalai Lama and Tibetans from Tibet.
The five-day festival has a series of exhibitions, films and other events representing Tibetan culture. Traditional Tibetan cuisine will be served at the Gandhi-King Plaza at the India International Centre.
10am-6.30pm. India International Centre, 40, Max Mueller Marg, Lodhi Estate (24619431).
MUMBAI
Art
Mint Condition
From 27 March
When Harry Potter puts on his father’s old cloak, he becomes invisible. But for Ashim Ahluwalia, Shumona Goel, Farhad Bomanjee and Dale Cannedy Azim, their invisibility cloak is the collective called Suspect. Once a Suspect, Ahluwalia is no longer just the director of the documentary ‘John and Jane’. Shumona Goel isn’t just an experimental film-maker and Farhad Bomanjee and Dale Cannedy Azim are more than upcoming photographers. They submerge their individual identities and become a single group of film-makers, sound artists, poets, anthropologists and photographers. This fortnight, Suspect puts up a show titled ‘Mint Condition’.
12-9pm. Kala Ghoda Cafe, 10, Ropewalk Lane, opposite Trishna Restaurant, Kala Ghoda, Fort (22633866).
Photography
A Long Exposure
30 March-4 April
T.S. Satyan, who began his career with the ‘Deccan Herald’ in 1948, shot for ‘The Illustrated Weekly’, ‘Time’ and ‘Life’, received the Padma Shri and has exhibited at the UN headquarters in New York, has pretty much viewed the nation’s evolution through a lens. ‘A Long Exposure’, a retrospective of his works, covers milestones from his career, from images that won him acclaim and awards to pictures that are perhaps the only record of the India that once was. Now 85, his pictures are as much a lesson in India’s history as a visual memoir of his career. And at ‘A Long Exposure’, each emerges as powerful as the other.
11am-7pm, Monday-Saturday. Institute of Contemporary Indian Art, 22/26, K Dubash Marg, next to Rampart House, Kala Ghoda (22048138).
Film
Man on Wire
2 April
It all started at a dentist’s waiting room in France, with a magazine feature on a New York construction whose twin towers would absolutely dwarf the Eiffel Tower. The teenage Philippe Petit was so entranced, he ripped the article out and stuck it up his jumper. He dreamt right then of walking on a wire between what would become the two towers of the World Trade Center, and, in 1974, he actually did it. Just how this act of graceful insanity came to pass is chronicled in James Marsh’s captivating documentary, which intercuts the build-up and execution of the walk itself with Petit’s remarkable backstory.
6pm. Little Theatre, National Centre for the Performing Arts, near Trident Hotel, Nariman Point (66223737).
Music
Mouse on Mars
27 March
In a genre where careers are notoriously short-lived, the longevity of German electronica act Mouse on Mars can be put down to one simple fact: They constantly reinvent themselves. Each of their eight studio albums has been radically different from its predecessor. After a decade and a half of touring the globe, the trio is more than confident of winning over an audience that has never seen them before: Mumbai.
7pm. Sophia Bhabha auditorium, Sophia College, Bhulabhai Desai Road (23678550). Passes available from Max Mueller Bhavan (22027710) and Indian Council for Cultural Relations (22813572).
BANGALORE
Art
Reflections
Until 10 April
An exhibition of paintings by noted Norwegian artist Elling Reitan, who specializes in multimedia art, graphical prints and sophisticated glassware. In the 1980s, Reitan studied art under one of Norway’s most famous contemporary artists, Odd Nerdrum, alongside literature (English and German) at the Universities of Oslo and Trondheim in Norway.
Reitan made his debut in 1984 and has since exhibited in around 100 solo and group shows around the world. His works are part of a permanent display at New York’s Westwood Gallery, and collectors of his work include Queen Sonja of Norway and the celebrity couple, the Beckhams.
11am-7pm, Monday-Saturday. Time and Space, 55, Lavelle Road (22124117).
Theatre
Twelve Thousand Little Pies and Other Delicacies: Eat like a French
27-28 March
Directed by Claire Denieul. Writer: Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin. Cast: Claire Denieul, Divya Raghuram, Sushima S.V. and Olivia Courtin. 1 hour, 20 min.
French gastronome Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin’s ‘La Physiologie du Goût’ (The Physiology of Taste or Transcendental Gastronomy), published in 1825, is perhaps the first formal study of the cultural, aesthetic and physiological aspects of eating. ‘Twelve Thousand Little Pies…’, according to director Claire Denieul, will be the first instance of Brillat-Savarin’s text being incorporated into a stage production.
Largely composed of poetic orations between four gourmands, the play will explore some of Brillat-Savarin’s ideas on food as a doorway into a deeper reflection of life. The stage production attempts to open a window into French-ness itself—cultural, aesthetic and intellectual trappings et al—and includes French costumes and music from the 1800s, reimagined for an Indian audience. ‘Twelve thousand little pies…’ uniquely dovetails the onstage action with an actual food-tasting experience immediately after.
7.30pm. Ranga Shankara, 36/2, 8th Cross, 2nd Phase, JP Nagar (26592777). Tickets, Rs250.
Music
Thermal and a Quarter
28 March
In a cross-city ‘Jaago Re’ initiative, the band plays a concert titled ‘Shut Up and Vote!’. Thermal and a Quarter has played in Kolkata, New Delhi, Mumbai and Chennai, with local acts from each city performing curtain-raisers to its performances. The last concert in the tour will be Bangalore, where the opening act will be Parachute XVI.
6.30pm. St Joseph’s Commerce College Grounds, 163, Brigade Road (25360644).
Dance
Hip hop
29 March
Bend it like it is: Richard Thooloor.
Shorty has them apple-bottom jeans, and boots with the fur, and he be a playa with them baggy pants. The Reeboks with the straps is what y’all goin to see when them hip-hop dancers from Lourd Vijay’s Dance Studio will go low low low low. Richard Thooloor, he the man, he’ll bend like rubber band. Word.
6.30-7.30pm. Alliance Francaise, Thimmaiah Road, Vasanth Nagar (41231340).
Dance
Bangalore Dance Collective
28 March
Abhilash Ningappa recently finished his post graduation in choreography from the Salzburg Experimental Academy of Dance, Austria. Back in Bangalore, he met up with friends and dancers training at the Attakkalari Center for Movement Arts and decided to start the Bangalore Dance Collective. Their first piece as a collective is titled ‘New Trash’.
7pm. Seva Sadan 14th Cross, West Park Road, opposite MLA College, Malleswaram (23347830).
Schedules may be subject to change
CONNECT
WEAR
In a cricket-mad country, these cufflinks let you wear your passion on your sleeve, literally. Orosilber India, a company that makes men’s accessories, designed these funky rhodium and enamel cufflinks. At Rs1,500, they aren’t cheap, but who’s counting money when it comes to love? Wear them to the IPL.
Available at Old Street, E-4, South Extension-II, New Delhi (26258336); Narain’s Stores, L-33/34, Lajpat Nagar-II, New Delhi (29816157); and all New Delhi Diwan Saheb outlets (www. diwansaheb. com/outlets. html) Ambika Muttoo
PLAY
If you were wondering what board game John Nash was playing in the movie ‘A Beautiful Mind’, chances are that the option ‘Go’ did not come to mind. The game originated in China and is considered one of the world’s oldest board games (25,000 years old, apparently). ‘Go’ is a two-player game with a simple target: Control a larger portion of the board than your opponent. In New Delhi, the All India Go Society has been working to promote and develop the game. The society is affiliated to the International Go Federation. For details, call RS Tiwari (9810000169). Janice Pariat
VISIT
To ensure that you don’t forget Dharavi after ‘Slumdog Millionaire’, the Acorn Foundation (India), an NGO that works with ragpickers and waste recyclers, will host the Dharavi festival on 29 March. Films, information kiosks, games and music performances will highlight Dharavi’s role in keeping the rest of Mumbai clean. But the festival’s high point is undoubtedly the Rags to Ragas evening.
MMRDA Grounds, Bandra Kurla Complex, Bandra (E). Exhibitions, 10am- 6pm; music festival, 6pm onwards. For passes to music performances, contact Acorn Foundation India (26428618). Rachel Lopez
FIGHT
The piping hot gaming face-off: Gordon Ramsay vs Jamie Oliver!
‘What’s Cooking with Jamie Oliver’ (Nintendo DS, Rs2,145) is not so much a game as an interactive cookbook. The drag-and-drop interface lets you create virtual dishes using approximately a hundred of Jamie’s recipes. You may give up after 5 boring minutes of boiling.
‘Hell’s Kitchen: The Game’ (Nintendo DS, Rs2,145) is an against-the-clock task to get all the dishes out of the kitchen well-cooked and hot, lest you incur the wrath of Gordon, who spouts lines such as “Oh, **** me senseless.” True, it’s difficult, but the game’s addictiveness sees you through. Derek Adams
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First Published: Thu, Mar 26 2009. 09 56 PM IST