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First Published: Fri, Feb 29 2008. 12 39 AM IST
Updated: Fri, Feb 29 2008. 12 39 AM IST
DELHI
Dance
Navtej Johar
29 February
Navtej Johar will present ‘Meenakshi’, a tribute to the Goddess of Madurai. 7.30pm. Epicentre, Apparel House, Sector 44, Gurgaon (95124-2715000).
Priyadarsini Govind
3 March
Noted Chennai-based bharatanatyam danseuse Priyadarsini Govind will present a recital. 6.30pm. India International Centre, 40, Lodhi Estate, Max Mueller Marg (24619431).
Art
About Neetika
Ongoing
Photoink inaugurates its new gallery with a show by Anay Mann, who captures daily life in a charming manner. 11am-7pm. Photoink Gallery, 1, Faiz Road, Jhandewalan (23010488).
Click!
From 1 March
A large photography exhibition marks Vadehra Art Gallery’s entry into the medium. The exhibition is almost a who’s who of Indian photography, and it has a nice mix of established artists and younger ones. Though not comprehensive by any means, and not necessarily concept-driven, this show offers a chance to sweep one’s gaze over the photography scene. 11am-7pm. Vadehra Art Gallery, D-178 Okhla, Phase I (55474005).
Music
Susmit Bose
1 March
The self-styled “urban folk” singer gives his first show of the year to celebrate the release of his new album ‘Be The Change’. He will be accompanied by Deepak Castelino on the guitar and banjo. 7pm. India Habitat Centre auditorium (24682222).
Alain Brunet Trio
2 March
The French jazz trio comprising Luc Fenoli (guitar), Jean-Louis Dô (drums, vocals) and Alain Brunet (trumpet) joins tabla player Manosh Bardhan and Debi Prasad on sarod for an evening of jazz fusion. Organized by Alliance Française de Delhi. 7pm. The Ashok amphitheatre, entrance from Neeti Marg (26110101).
MUMBAI
Film
There Will Be Blood
1 March
Two cast-iron certainties emerge from watching Paul Thomas Anderson’s new movie ‘There Will Be Blood’. The first is that this rich, literate film is both an intense character study and a fable on the foundation of modern America. The second is the sheer inevitability that Daniel Day-Lewis will spend the next few months striding on and off stages to collect awards for his entrancing performance as Daniel Plainview, a stick-thin, hobbling, silver-tongued oil prospector. Plainview transforms himself from rags to riches between 1898 and 1927, but never loses the dirt under his fingernails or his drive for self-preservation—even once he is living a life of immense wealth and madness in a sprawling Californian mansion. In major theatres.
Music
Black and White
1 March
Niche Entertainment presents a concert of music from the golden age of Hindi cinema which, according to them, was the period between 1945 and 1968. Clips of black and white films, featuring artistes such as K.L. Saigal, Bimal Roy, Raj Kapoor, Dev Anand, Madhubala and Meena Kumari, will be screened as singers such as Hrishikesh Ranade, Vibhavari Apte-Joshi, Jitendra Abhyankar and Swarada Gokhale “act out” their songs. The show, which has been conceptualized and directed by Milind Oak, will be peppered with anecdotes and trivia about the films and songs. 7pm.
Tata Theatre, NCPA. Tickets, Rs120, Rs160, Rs200, Rs240, Rs320.
Avial
4 March
Avial, the popular vegetable stew from Kerala, can be prepared in only 15 minutes. Avial, the Malayalam rock band, has taken over five years to release its debut album. Formed in 2003, the group now comprises 34-year-old vocalist and synthesizer player Tony John, 25-year-old guitarist Rex Vijayan, 25-year-old drummer Mithun Puthanveetil and 30-year-old bassist Naresh Kamath, each of whom previously performed in English rock bands such as Karizma, Motherjane, Rage and Bombay Black.
Like Avial, their music seamlessly blends the sound of ancient Malayalam words with a melodic sensibility that’s equally influenced by classic rock bands such as Led Zeppelin, progressive rock bands such as Rush and modern rock bands such as Incubus. Their lyrics, which are written by scholars familiar with the language now only heard in poetry and folk songs, are based around such hefty themes as deforestation, the dangers of excess and political indifference. 8pm. Land’s End Amphitheatre, Bandstand, opposite Hotel Sea Rock, Bandra (W) (66681234)
Gateways
5 March
This fusion concert, which has been organized by the National Centre for the Performing Arts’ Jindal Arts Centre, in collaboration with Musica Production, aims to provide a platform for the fading dance and music traditions of Indian folk and tribal performers. Siddi (Indians of African origin) and Dangi musicians from Gujarat will jam on stage with jazz and Indian classical musicians, trumpet player Martin Dahanukar, sarod player Arnab Charabarty, sarangi player Sabir Khan, double bass player Lavine Da Costa and percussionist and vocalist Somnath Roy. Percussionist Nishith Mehta. 6.30pm. Tata Theatre, NCPA.
Dance
Malavika Sarukkai
6 March
On 6 March 1972, Malavika Sarukkai made her stage debut at the now-defunct Bhulabhai Desai auditorium. The initiation event, known as an ‘arengetram’, is as significant to a bharatanatyam dancer as a World Cup victory is to a cricketer. Her mother, Saroja Kamakshi, still has vivid memories of that performance which she describes as being “full of devotion”. It’s a pleasant coincidence that Sarukkai will perform at Jnanpravaha this fortnight, exactly 36 years after the day on which she had her arengetram. 6 March also happens to be Mahashivratri, the birth anniversary of Shiva, who is worshipped by dancers for his vigorous terpsichorean skills. 6.00pm. Jnanpravaha, Queens Mansion, Third Floor, AK Nayak Marg, Fort. Limited donor passes, for Rs250, will be available at the venue from 22 February (22072974/5).
RECOMMENDED
DELHI
Music
Shriram Shankar Lal Music Festival
29 February-2 March
The Shriram Bharatiya Kala Kendra presents the 61st edition of its music festival, the oldest of its kind in the country. Special care has been taken to incorporate the best tabla accompanists from the national pool in accordance with the choice of artistes. Artistes include Ayaan Ali Khan, Pandit Jasraj, Rajan and Sajan Mishra, Veena Sahasrabuddhe, and Rashid Khan. 7pm. All performances at Kamani auditorium. Invitations can be collected from Shriram Bharatiya Kala Kendra, 1, Copernicus Marg (23386428/29).
MUMBAI
FIlm
Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street
3 March
“All that blood!” exclaims the pie-maker Mrs Lovett in Stephen Sondheim’s musical ‘Sweeney Todd’ as she spies the murderous barber’s first victim. Tim Burton’s film adaptation, which is also a musical and features Johnny Depp and Helena Bonham Carter, certainly delivers that: bloody raindrops dripping over the opening credits; a carmine tide in the city’s sewers; blood gushing from the throats of Depp’s victims, choreographed to Sondheim’s soaring score. Todd, a Fleet Street barber, surreptitiously murders his clients and their corpses are profitably made into delicious meat pies by his obliging neighbour, Mrs Lovett. “We’ll serve anyone… to anyone” as the lyric artfully puts it. In major theatres.
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First Published: Fri, Feb 29 2008. 12 39 AM IST
More Topics: Movies | Music | Exhibition | Theatre | Dance |