The finesse of imperfection

The finesse of imperfection
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First Published: Wed, Oct 15 2008. 12 12 AM IST

Budapest-Black and White pictures.
Budapest-Black and White pictures.
Updated: Wed, Oct 15 2008. 12 12 AM IST
It took her all of 3 hours to shoot the pictures being shown in her current exhibition, Budapest-Black and White pictures. French photographer, Anne Maniglier found herself overwhelmed by the beauty and art in the city of Budapest in Hungary and went into overdrive clicking. “I have always been fascinated by Hungarian artists and have felt that they have been good competition to the much talked about artists of France. They are very true to their art and translate their hearts in to their work” says Maniglier. Her works in the current exhibition are all pictures of reflections in water. “I am a water person, and Budapest with all its water bodies and Turkish baths inspired me”.
Budapest-Black and White pictures.
But while shooting the pictures was done in one passionate spurt, she spent days indulging herself in developing her pictures and getting them printed on slightly coarse Japanese paper. Every picture has been printed in two halves, and pasted together at the centre. “You’ll have to look carefully to notice the cut, but I did it because it has a sense of imperfection and that was beautiful,” says Maniglier who shot her pictures on film.
Having worked as a photojournalist for various French newspapers, The New York Times and the International Herald Tribune, Maniglier understands the need for speed and the evolution of digital photography, but when it comes to art, she believes that nothing gives better texture than a picture shot on film.
Talking about new age and contemporary photography, Maniglier is quick to point out that while she’s been a photographer and a picture editor (with Magnum Photos), it’s only now after close to three decades in the field that she finds herself maturing into an artist.
The journey from photography for documentation to photography for art in France was testing for her. “Europe found it difficult to integrate my idea of art and vice versa. India is in that nascent vibrant stage and I can see the country begin that same personal journey I made.” Having said that, she still thinks that India has a long way to go to accept photography as art, but is utterly fascinated by how experimental artists are with their paintings, sculptures and installations.
Anne Maniglier resides in Mysore, Karnataka when in India. Her current exhibition, Budapest-Black and White pictures will run until 24 October at Gallery Sumukha, Bangalore.
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First Published: Wed, Oct 15 2008. 12 12 AM IST