The red devils

The red devils
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First Published: Fri, Jan 23 2009. 09 29 PM IST

 Red hot: Heaps of chillies at a market in Guntur, Andhra Pradesh. Marryam H Reshii
Red hot: Heaps of chillies at a market in Guntur, Andhra Pradesh. Marryam H Reshii
Updated: Fri, Jan 23 2009. 09 29 PM IST
I have a friend who travels to Europe and the US with a bottle of Tabasco. She doesn’t relish food that is less than incendiary. The result is that she just has to spice up her food and she—and doubtless others like her—find that Tabasco works just fine. It is spicy, its liquid consistency makes it easy and non-messy to pour and the size is ideal to tuck into a handbag. My friend, a card-carrying Indian, doesn’t see anything strange in using a chilli seasoning from outside India. To me, it is ironic that an Indian depends on a spicy seasoning that comes from outside Asia, and that too from North America.
Red hot: Heaps of chillies at a market in Guntur, Andhra Pradesh. Marryam H Reshii
But chillies, once upon a time endemic to South America’s Bolivia, are now found in many parts of the world, Tabasco being only one example. Hungary’s paprika comes from a sweet pepper, too mild for the likes of my friend, but Italy’s extreme southern state, Calabria, has tiny chillies that even my friend approves of, though she heaped scorn on a jar of Italian chilli chutney that I presented her, complaining that it had no punch. In Italy, chillies are used for a variety of purposes, principally in Calabrian salami, which is spicy even for the average Indian taste.
One of the spiciest meals I’ve eaten outside India has to be at a Moroccan restaurant on the outskirts of Paris. Ask for a plate of kebabs and you’ll get a couple of dry seekh kebabs, a bowl of couscous, another bowl of a mildly flavoured soup and a plate of chillies pounded and made into a chutney. While it was fiery enough, it paled in comparison to a meal I had in Shanghai at a Sichuan restaurant. Barely half a cup of diced chicken was deep fried with 50g of chopped red chillies to make a Sichuan classic called Chonqing Chicken. I thought the point of the dish was the chicken. It was not: The chillies had to be consumed as well. All around us, the Chinese version of lager louts kept ordering ever hotter and spicier dishes with an air of bravado.
It’s easy to forget that chillies only reached our shores four centuries ago—the twinkling of an eye for historians. Before that time, Indian food was made spicy with black pepper and ginger. Today, Asian food has sort of acquired a stranglehold on chillies and nobody connects it with South America anymore. North-east India has been put on the culinary map of the world because of the Bhut Jolokia, among the hottest chillies in the world.
But Mexico is unarguably the most sophisticated user of chillies. What’s more, while we tend to grade our chillies into hot, hotter and hottest, Mexico boasts of 200 varieties that are smoked, served fresh or dried, and have a wealth of flavours and pungency levels.
Naga Chilli Garlic Pork
Serves 4
Ingredients:
600g pork, with fat and skin, diced into 2-inch pieces
100g onion, sliced
100g garlic, sliced
2 raja chillies, crushed
25g salt
1 litre water
Method:
Sear the pork pieces fat side down, in a hot, heavy-bottomed stew pan, till golden brown. Add the salt, garlic and onion. Add water and bring it to a simmer, then add the crushed raja chillies. Cover and simmer on low heat for an hour and a half. Check the seasoning and finish it with a quick rapid boil. It is best served with steamed rice.
Write to Marryam at travellingtiffin@livemint.com
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First Published: Fri, Jan 23 2009. 09 29 PM IST
More Topics: Tabasco | Food | Spice | Liquid | Lounge |