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Kids’ corner

Kids’ corner
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First Published: Mon, Jul 13 2009. 08 05 PM IST

Chowder airs at 4pm
Chowder airs at 4pm
Updated: Mon, Jul 13 2009. 08 05 PM IST
Food fetish
Starting Monday, Cartoon Network introduces the Hindi version of its last year’s top series on American TV, Chowder, in India.
Chowder airs at 4pm
The main character Chowder is a purple blob, generally debated to be a cusp between a bear, bunny and a cat. He is an apprentice to a chef and hopes to become a great one himself some day. However, Chowder is no Ratatouille; though he can eat unimaginable quantities of food, he cannot cook.
The head chef is called Mung Daal (Tadka Laal in Hindi), his wife Truffles (Khuskhus in Hindi) and everything in the town has something to do with food.
One loss in the Hindi version is the lack of variety in names. The English series has dishes from across the world but the Hindi adaptation restricts itself to using mostly Indian food items. So Shnitzel (a type of cutlet in Israel and Turkey) has become Ragda (as in Ragda Patties), Truffles becomes Khuskhus etc.
The pilot episode Ice Cream Baba intended to be educative, but with its gross-out action (the episode is about how over-eating ice-cream is harmful for health) doesn’t capture the imagination. The adaptations of the pun and metafictional references don’t have the same sophistication as the original English version. The voiceover in Ice Cream Baba is almost annoying with its incessant chant of Bollywood dialogues.
Adults tuning in to watch the show must be warned that there is too much vomit and spit, and only children will be able to appreciate it.
Chowder airs on Cartoon Network at 4pm from Monday to Thursday.
Blessy Augustine
Manga in colour
Girl Power by Ragini Srikrishna
In her debut exhibition, Ragini Srikrishna, a class nine student from Bangalore, has on display eight acrylic paintings inspired by the Japanese Manga comics. Srikrishna,14, started painting three years ago, not very long after she visited the Manga Museum in Kyoto in 2005. “At the museum I saw Manga artists draw strips and ink them the traditional way. The strokes in Manga are very bold and lot stronger than other forms of painting. I picked up a book on the method of drawing and painting right there,” says Srikrishna. She then began drawing pieces inspired by the comics she picked up, only her acrylic paintings were mostly in colour as opposed to traditional Manga that’s printed in black and white. “Surprisingly a lot of my friends, even those who read Manga comics loved the coloured ones,” says Srikrishna.
While poring over the Buddha series drawn by Osamu Tezuka, Srikrishna understood that the most expressive parts of the Manga comic characters are the eyes. “The features of girls are softer with large almond eyes. The hair is always long,” she says. She is specifically interested in the Manga sub-genre ‘Shojo’ featuring young girls and women, where the stories have a hint of romance and lesser action. “When they do have action, it’s the girl who’s doing the fighting,” adds Srikrishna who has named one of her works Girl Power.
Ragini Srikrishna’s works are exhibited at the Oxford Bookstore, 5th Block, Jayanagar, Bangalore, until 18 July.
Pavitra Jayaraman
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First Published: Mon, Jul 13 2009. 08 05 PM IST