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Cute, connected and compact

Cute, connected and compact
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First Published: Tue, Apr 06 2010. 06 37 AM IST

Updated: Thu, Apr 29 2010. 11 33 AM IST
Samsung Corbypro B5310
The Samsung CorbyPRO screams youth, vibrance and chic style. The phone comes with a whole bunch of widgets and apps for connecting to social networks and Web services such as Flickr and Facebook. It has a 2.8-inch display that performs decently for a resistive touch screen. However, be prepared to encounter several mis-taps and unintended application launches in normal usage. The highlight of the phone is the slide-out Qwerty keypad. We found it to be quite good, with adequately bevelled keys that provide just the right amount of
tactile feedback. The 3.15MP camera produces sharp pictures in normal lighting conditions, and that’s it. As for build quality, despite being almost entirely plastic, the phone gives the impression of being sturdy—even the slide-out keypad. There are several enhancements in this phone over predecessors in the Corby series, namely Wi-Fi, 3.5G connectivity, and in-built GPS. All things considered, it’s a “cute” bundle of features and until Qwerty Android devices breach this price point, we’d say go for it if “touch” is a must and Qwerty is what you were always looking for.
Dell Inspiron Mini 10
The Mini 10 is a solid little thing, with a glossy black finish. Build quality is top class. The hinge mechanism is really sturdy. The keypad is one of the best we’ve come across on a netbook. Where most keypads are cramped, Dell wastes no space with a keypad bezel and provides really large keys, with great feedback. Bevelling is barely noticeable, but the keys are large enough to negate this effect. Typing is, as a result, much easier, thereby addressing our number one grouse with netbooks. The display is decent enough, although colour and contrast take the proverbial toss. The trackpad is responsive enough although we don’t agree with integrating the mouse keys into it.
The Mini 10 performs on a par with other netbooks based on similar configurations. It comes pre-loaded with Windows XP, so the memory is sufficient for most tasks. We got a six-cell battery, and this stretches battery life to over 4 hours. It’s 3G ready, with a SIM slot. The Mini 10 makes a very good buy for anyone looking for a solid netbook.
Sony Ericsson Satio
Satio is one of the rare full-screen touch phones from Sony Ericsson. This is a bulky handset, but a good looker. The phone runs on an ARM Cortex-A8 600 MHz and the Symbian S60 operating system (OS). It has a resistive touch screen, which is not very responsive. The user interface is a bit altered from typical Symbian style—there are five home screens on the Satio. It supports Wi-Fi and comes with an inbuilt menu called Locations which has all the GPS functionality.
The on-screen Qwerty keypad is quite good thanks to the haptic feedback and large keys which reduce typos. The speaker quality of the phone is ordinary. The built-in earphones give a decent output. The sluggish response kills the Internet experience.
The USP of the phone is its camera. Dual flash technology gives good results in low light conditions. Video shooting at 30 frames per second allows live zooming option. The accelerometer of the phone changes the orientation of images accordingly. This phone is overpriced, considering it uses a resistive touch (not good for Internet usage).
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First Published: Tue, Apr 06 2010. 06 37 AM IST