The ‘Mint Lounge’ love list

A quick team poll determined our favourite couples
Comment E-mail Print Share
First Published: Thu, Feb 07 2013. 08 03 PM IST
Norwegian Wood: In this love story, even the most mundane everyday things glow with symbolic possibilities.
Norwegian Wood: In this love story, even the most mundane everyday things glow with symbolic possibilities.
Updated: Thu, Feb 07 2013. 08 14 PM IST
u Professor Higgins and Eliza in George Bernard Shaw’s ‘Pygmalion’:
Shaw strips love of the trade it tends to become and establishes the dignity of what a woman can be in a relationship.
u Lemony Snicket and Beatrice Baudelaire in Lemony Snicket’s ‘A Series of Unfortunate Events’:
The whimsical, twisted ways that Lemony declares his undying love for (the much dead) Beatrice in each of his missives to her.
u Florentino and Fermina in ‘Love in the Time of Cholera’:
The classic eternal love story that can wait, and that stays despite wrinkles.
photo
u Draupadi and Arjun in the Mahabharat:
The instant and fiery chemistry, doomed togetherness, spiked by passion, anger and intimate betrayal for loyalty to a larger cause.
u Toru and Naoko and Midori in Haruki Murakami’s ‘Norwegian Wood’:
It has a haunting, lyrical quality, although told with a surface simplicity. In this love story, even the most mundane everyday things glow with symbolic possibilities.
u All Meg Ryan-Tom Hanks pairings:
They’re a funny, real, spirited couple, always trying to outdo each other. No real sacrifice or conflict involved, just plain, earnest love. They are an escape.
u Michael and Julia in Vikram Seth’s ‘An Equal Music’:
It began with music and continued when there was none, when Julia turns deaf.
u Shakuntala and Dushyant:
For sheer proof of the fact that true love can conquer anything—even the curse of forgetfulness.
u Mr Chow and Mrs Chan in Wong Kar Wai’s ‘In The Mood for Love’ (2000):
photo
Wong Kar Wai proves that you can make an entire movie based on nothing more than the sensation of your heart melting bit by bit.
u Elizabeth and Darcy in Jane Austen’s ‘Pride And Prejudice’:
Romance between two equal people, and therefore fun all the way. Yet so yin and yang. They can love and hurt each other in equal measure.
u Charles Swann and Odette de Crécy in the first volume of Marcel Proust’s ‘In Search of Lost Time’:
Their romance was born out of a need to possess (in the case of Swann) and a need for material progress (in the case of Odette), yet their love was real and full of complicated emotions.
u Rochester and Jane in Charlotte Brontë’s ‘Jane Eyre’:
So dark, so plain, so hot.
u Catherine and Heathcliff in Emily Brontë’s ‘Wuthering Heights’:
This love was never meant to be. Wait! Was it even love from both sides?
u ‘Calvin and Hobbes’:
They accept unconditionally every wild thought or idea and understand each other without having to spell it out.
Comment E-mail Print Share
First Published: Thu, Feb 07 2013. 08 03 PM IST
blog comments powered by Disqus
  • Wed, Oct 22 2014. 09 49 PM
  • Wed, Oct 15 2014. 11 40 PM
Subscribe |  Contact Us  |  mint Code  |  Privacy policy  |  Terms of Use  |  Advertising  |  Mint Apps  |  About HT Media  |  Jobs
Contact Us
Copyright © 2014 HT Media All Rights Reserved