Urban living

Urban living
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First Published: Thu, Jan 10 2008. 11 26 PM IST

The family entertainment area adjoins the central hall. Visible beyond the glass wall to left is a part of the sea-facing balcony opening out from the central hall
The family entertainment area adjoins the central hall. Visible beyond the glass wall to left is a part of the sea-facing balcony opening out from the central hall
Updated: Thu, Jan 10 2008. 11 26 PM IST
The family entertainment area adjoins the central hall. Visible beyond the glass wall to left is a part of the sea-facing balcony opening out from the central hall
Before they started work on this luxury apartment, architects Bahaar and Kaif Faquih of the Mumbai-based firm Faquih and Associates, spent considerable time getting to know their client Piyush Kothari and understanding the family’s requirements.
The duplex, spread over 8,000 sq. ft, has a fairly symmetrical plan. A perforated wall separates the lobby from the central hall. The wall, in a sense, sets the design dictum that has been followed throughout the house—visual connectivity.
The double-height (22ft.) central hall has two wings, one on each side. There are no doors between the family entertainment space, the dining and breakfast corner and the kitchen. Sliding glass doors separate the balcony from this central space. Only the grandparents’ room on the ground floor and the guest bedroom have have doors
Architects Kaif and Bahaar Faquih
“Visual connectivity is a quintessential urban design requirement. People constantly want to be in the thick of things and this does become a challenge when the space is very large, so we thought of demarcating the area with objects instead of dead walls,” says Kaif.
A powder room that adjoins the dining area, the staff quarters with a private stairway and a utility room are a part of the ground-floor plan. In fact, the ground level can act as a separate apartment, considering its various facilities.
A wood-and-glass staircase and a private lift provide access to the first floor, which has two fully-equipped suites. The bathing spaces and walk-in wardrobes in the master suite are quite the last word in hedonistic comforts.
Bedrooms for the children are luxurious too, and there is also a pantry area for that impromptu midnight party.
Even though the first level functions as a separate entity, the architects have ensured that it isn’t completely cut off from the main house. Both the master suite and the children’s suite look into the central hall. This ensures both visual connectivity and cross ventilation.
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2.The central hall, with its 22 ft high cross-vault design ceiling accentuated by the chandelier. This is the heart of the house and most of the core spaces either open on to or interact in some way with it.
3.The dining table is of highly polished granite. The boxes on the wall are no artwork, they are actually storage cabinets made from medium-density fibreboard (MDF).
4.The artwork for the master bedroom was commissioned from artist Yashovardhan—the meditative Buddha has been created by stippling (to draw, engrave, or paint in dots or short strokes) on canvas. Bathrooms in onyx and marble and extravagant walk-in wardrobes form part of this suite.
5.Part of the living room. Sober white walls and Makrana marble flooring are coordinated with beige upholstery. A painting by Sri Lankan artist Senaka Senanayake introduces a splash of colour.
Brought to you by Better Interiors
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First Published: Thu, Jan 10 2008. 11 26 PM IST
More Topics: Urban living | Luxury | Duplex | Kitchen | Living space |