Oil rises slightly to $34 amid demand concerns

Oil rises slightly to $34 amid demand concerns
AP
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First Published: Fri, Feb 13 2009. 10 19 AM IST
Updated: Fri, Feb 13 2009. 10 19 AM IST
Singapore: Oil rose back above $34 a barrel Friday in Asia after concerns about weakening US consumer demand sent crude near five-year lows overnight.
Light, sweet crude for March delivery rose 60 cents to $34.58 a barrel by midday in Singapore on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract fell $1.96 overnight to settle at $33.98 a barrel.
Crude fell to a five-year low at $33.20 a barrel in December from a record $147.27 in July. In each of the last three days, prices have risen slightly in Asia only to end up dropping about $2 in US trading.
Investors are worried that the worst US recession in decades could be deepening, and taking demand for crude down with it. Job losses are a particular concern as unemployment drags on consumer spending.
The number of Americans requesting first-time unemployment benefits remained near a 26-year high last week, the Commerce Department said Thursday. The number of initial jobless benefit claims were a seasonally adjusted 623,000, little changed from 631,000 the previous week, which was the highest number since October 1982.
The number of people claiming benefits for more than one week rose to 4.81 million two weeks ago from 4.78 million the previous week, the highest total since records began in 1967.
US oil storage sites, including the main depot in Cushing, Oklahoma, are brimming with crude, reflecting the drop-off in demand. Producers who might otherwise store their crude are dumping it onto the market, pushing the price down.
Contracts for later in the year show higher prices. The April contract is trading at $42.27 a barrel.
A $789 billion stimulus bill, which President Barack Obama could sign within days, will likely take months to impact consumer spending, and investors worry it may not spark a sustainable recovery.
The collapse in crude prices threatens to make some higher-cost fields unprofitable, which could lead producers to curtail output.
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First Published: Fri, Feb 13 2009. 10 19 AM IST
More Topics: Oil Prices | Crude | Demand | Recession | US |