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Ethics and economics of clean technology

Ethics and economics of clean technology
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First Published: Tue, Aug 14 2007. 01 06 AM IST
Updated: Tue, Aug 14 2007. 01 06 AM IST
India Cleantech Forum
3 AugustITC Hotel Maurya Sheraton and TowersNew DelhiThe usually opposing priorities—ethics and economics—ran as parallel themes through the conference on clean technology in New Delhi.
An audience that filled the Maurya Sheraton conference room listened first to a speech by Sun Group’s vice-chairman Uday Khemka on food, water and health safety.
“We used to think it was a problem for our grandchildren, then our children, now we know climate change is happening now,” he said.
And then the crowd gave its attention to an American investment banker, Dusty Wunderlich, vice-president of investment banking at international investment banking and financial advisory firm Arvco Capital Research LLC.
Wunderlich was in India for the first time. He was pitching his clients after showing the natural lake and forest that is home to his office in Nevada.
The five sessions of the day—hosted by the Confederation of Indian Industry and Clean Technology AustralAsia—were populated with domestic and foreign investors and bankers, as well as companies in the clean tech business and non-profit intermediaries.
Yet, there was a clear break between those who understood finance and those who were deep into the scientific complexity of renewable energy. Several expert speakers were certain to say, “I am not an expert.”
Even the secretary at the ministry of new and renewable energy, V. Subramanian, noted the absence of “the expert”, lamenting that he had no one-stop shop for understanding renewable energy.
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First Published: Tue, Aug 14 2007. 01 06 AM IST