The White House race

Hillary Clinton has a long slog ahead of her, and a Donald Trump to tackle, if she wants to be the first woman in the White House


Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton have clinched nominations as the Republican and Democrat candidates, respectively, for the US Presidential elections. Photo: AFP
Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton have clinched nominations as the Republican and Democrat candidates, respectively, for the US Presidential elections. Photo: AFP

Hillary Clinton has made history as the first woman to be the presidential candidate of a major party in the US elections. But she has a long slog ahead of her if she wants to be the first woman in the White House. Her rival Donald Trump has shown great facility with divisive rhetoric—and if the race to secure the nomination from both parties has been more acrimonious than any in recent memory, the presidential contest is likely to be even more vicious.

But it’s the presidential candidates’ economic agendas, not the mud-slinging, that the world will be watching more closely. And with good reason. Trump has been alarmingly protectionist whenever he has spoken of trade issues or immigration. And Clinton has been pushed into taking a protectionist stance as well by her rival for the party nomination, Bernie Sanders. The global economy can ill afford such a stance, signalled or real, in its present state.

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