Consider all facts

Consider all facts
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First Published: Fri, Mar 02 2007. 12 28 AM IST
Updated: Fri, Mar 02 2007. 12 28 AM IST
This refers to the front-page report, ‘Politics derail IIT campus in Gujarat’ (Mint, 16 February). I feel it has not considered all facts. For example, I’m unable to understand how a satellite campus of IIT can start functioning with no infrastructure in place. Gujarat government’s offer of 300 acres is just a political gimmick and if one considers the subsidy involved in the cost of education of one IIT graduate, the offer of funding of Rs300 crore is also a case of cheap politics on the part of Narendra Modi’s government. Modi’s idea is simple: Set up a make-shift college just to encash the goodwill for IIT Mumbai.
The IIT administration has been pointing to a shortage of trained faculty in Mumbai itself. It will need a lot of time to develop trained faculty to do justice to the additional students. Lastly, if a campus is to be set up, preference should be given to existing well-established engineering colleges in both Maharashtra and Gujarat. This more sensible approach will do justice to students in both states.
Narendra M. Apte, Mumbai
I read with interest your column, ‘A letter for Indian husbands’, (Mint, 16 February). I got the sense that it’s not about equality for both sexes, but rather about one-upmanship. Quoting from the column, “...we were grateful to come home to find you reading to the children... we kissed you all goodnight and turned on the laptop.” And of course, the post-script. Are we trying to say, “Traditionally, it’s the men who do this. And now, some of us women can, too”? I feel we’ve completely lost the plot. Shouldn’t we move towards equality—in realizing dreams, career and household chores? Do two wrongs make a right? This is not to take away from your point about supporting one’s spouse. I’m completely for that.
P.S: This letter was typed by a male (in between deadlines, of course). mobisushi@gmail.com
I find the flavour in ‘A letter for Indian husbands’ the same as in the author’s first column (Mint, 2 February)—emotional, with a touching human angle.
I was impressed with the first article about the emotions of NRIs. We see India’s future prosperous when we find good talent returning to their own land.
Naresh Kumar
Re the solutions given by Muhammad Yunus of Grameen Bank in your interview with him, (Mint, 15 February), to replicate a similar business model in India. I would like to point out that micro-credit to farmers at 6% p.a. is not possible in India. The rate of borrowing is too high here and the bank would not be able to survive in the long run. Also, most of our commercial banks are not mature enough to lend to farmers without a mortgage or collateral. Of course, banks could take the initiative to ignore the creamy layer or the urban home-loan market and emphasize on rural development. The initiative taken by Yunus is a truly inspiring one, but not applicable in India as it is too late. The environment isn’t favourable.
Ankit Doshi
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First Published: Fri, Mar 02 2007. 12 28 AM IST
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