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Quick Edit | Keep on talking

Quick Edit | Keep on talking
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First Published: Mon, Dec 12 2011. 01 10 AM IST

South African international foreign affairs minister and chair of COP17 Maite Nkoana-Mashabane. Photo: AFP
South African international foreign affairs minister and chair of COP17 Maite Nkoana-Mashabane. Photo: AFP
Updated: Mon, Dec 12 2011. 01 10 AM IST
South African international foreign affairs minister and chair of COP17 Maite Nkoana-Mashabane. Photo: AFP
The South Africans will be relieved that the latest round of negotiations on climate change, which they hosted, ended with an agreement. The deal that emerged from the discussions in Durban is a compromise, the least that can be expected when more than 190 countries are trying to find a way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without compromising on their ability to stoke the fires of economic growth.
Durban saw the usual suspects lining up on opposite sides of the fence, India and China on the one side and the developed world on the other, with the smaller nations looking on in some frustration. The world’s biggest emerging economies wanted the accord worded in language that would be less constricting than the text the developed countries were pressing for. Still, countries are committed to carbon emission cuts and there’s a defined path to a deal on this in 2015, which will come into effect five years later. So long as everybody’s still talking to each other that
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First Published: Mon, Dec 12 2011. 01 10 AM IST